An Introduction to Buddhist Philosophy

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Cambridge University Press, 2008 M02 21 - 283 páginas
In this clearly written undergraduate textbook, Stephen Laumakis explains the origin and development of Buddhist ideas and concepts, focusing on the philosophical ideas and arguments presented and defended by selected thinkers and sutras from various traditions. He starts with a sketch of the Buddha and the Dharma, and highlights the origins of Buddhism in India. He then considers specific details of the Dharma with special attention to Buddhist metaphysics and epistemology, and examines the development of Buddhism in China, Japan, and Tibet, concluding with the ideas of the Dalai Lama and Thich Nhat Hanh. In each chapter he includes explanations of key terms and teachings, excerpts from primary source materials, and presentations of the arguments for each position. His book will be an invaluable guide for all who are interested in this rich and vibrant philosophy.

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Contenido

A sketch of the Buddha and the Dhamma
1
The life of Siddhattha Gotama
3
The contexts for the emergence of Buddhism
19
The basic teachings of the Buddha
45
One Buddhism or many Buddhisms?
61
Details of the Dhamma
81
Kamma Samsara and rebirth
83
Interdependent arising
105
Development of the DhammaDharma
175
Bodhidharmas and Huinengs Buddhisms
177
Pure Land Buddhism
207
Tibetan Buddhism
229
Two forms of contemporary Buddhism
247
Glossary
265
Bibliography
277
Index
282

Impermanence noenduringself and emptiness
125
Moksa and Nibbana
149

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Términos y frases comunes

Pasajes populares

Página 49 - Now this, O monks, is the Noble Truth of the way that leads to the cessation of pain : this is the Noble Eightfold Path — namely, right views, right intention, right speech, right action, right livelihood, right effort, right mindfulness, right concentration.
Página 47 - Now this, O monks, is the noble truth of the way that leads to the cessation of pain : this is the noble Eightfold Path, namely, right view, right intention, right speech, right action, right livelihood, right effort, right mindfulness, right concentration, "This is the noble truth of pain.
Página 87 - According as one acts, according as one conducts himself, so does he become. The doer of good becomes good. The doer of evil becomes evil. One becomes virtuous by virtuous action, bad by bad action.
Página 87 - Accordingly, those who are of pleasant conduct here - the prospect is, indeed, that they will enter a pleasant womb, either the womb of a Brahman," or the womb of a Kshatriya, or the womb of a Vaisya. But those who are of stinking conduct here - the prospect is, indeed, that they will enter a stinking womb, either the womb of a dog, or the womb of a swine, or the womb of an outcast.
Página 48 - Truth of suffering (Dukkha) is this: Birth is suffering; aging is suffering; sickness is suffering; death is suffering; sorrow and lamentation, pain, grief and despair are suffering; association with the unpleasant is suffering; dissociation from the pleasant is suffering; not to get what one wants is suffering — in brief, the five aggregates of attachment are suffering.
Página 48 - Now this, bhikkhus, is the noble truth of the cessation of suffering: it is the...
Página 96 - I recollected my manifold past lives, that is, one birth, two births, three births, four births, five births, ten births, twenty births, thirty births, forty births, fifty births, a hundred births, a thousand births, a hundred thousand births, many aeons of...
Página 258 - Here, monks, a monk abides contemplating body as a body, ardent, clearly aware and mindful, having put aside hankering and fretting for the world; he abides contemplating feelings as feelings . . . ; he abides contemplating mind as mind . . . ; he abides contemplating mind-objects as mind-objects, ardent, clearly aware and mindful, having put aside hankering and fretting for the world.
Página x - We are what we think. All that we are arises with our thoughts. With our thoughts we make the world.
Página 48 - Now this, bhikkhus, is the noble truth of the origin of suffering: it is this craving which leads to renewed existence, accompanied by delight and lust, seeking delight here and there; that is, craving for sensual pleasures, craving for existence, craving for extermination.

Acerca del autor (2008)

Stephen J. Laumakis is Associate Professor in the Philosophy Department at the University of St Thomas, Minnesota.

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