The New Urban Crisis: How Our Cities Are Increasing Inequality, Deepening Segregation, and Failing the Middle Class and What We Can Do About It

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Basic Books, Apr 11, 2017 - 336 páginas
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In recent years, the young, educated, and affluent have surged back into cities, reversing decades of suburban flight and urban decline. And yet all is not well, Richard Florida argues in The New Urban Crisis. Florida, one of the first scholars to anticipate this back-to-the-city movement in his groundbreaking The Rise of the Creative Class, demonstrates how the same forces that power the growth of the world's superstar cities also generate their vexing challenges: gentrification, unaffordability, segregation, and inequality. Meanwhile, many more cities still stagnate, and middle-class neighborhoods everywhere are disappearing. Our winner-take-all cities are just one manifestation of a profound crisis in today's urbanized knowledge economy.

A bracingly original work of research and analysis, The New Urban Crisis offers a compelling diagnosis of our economic ills and a bold prescription for more inclusive cities capable of ensuring growth and prosperity for all.

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LibraryThing Review

Crítica de los usuarios  - tenamouse67 - LibraryThing

I won this ARC in a GOODREAD giveaway -- The New Urban Crisis:.. by Richard Florida -- A very interesting read; very heavy on the research. I liked that the author has possible solutions. Leer comentario completo

The New Urban Crisis: How Our Cities Are Increasing Inequality, Deepening Segregation, and Failing the Middle Classand What We Can Do about

Crítica de los usuarios  - Publishers Weekly

Urban studies expert Florida (The Great Reset), who first gained acclaim studying the ascendancy of the “creative class,” now explores the broader effects of its rise in this timely, data-rich, and ... Leer comentario completo

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Acerca del autor (2017)

Richard Florida is university professor and director of cities at the Martin Prosperity Institute at the University of Toronto, a distinguished visiting fellow at NYU's Schack Institute of Real Estate, and the cofounder and editor-at-large of the Atlantic's CityLab.

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