The University of London, 1858-1900: The Politics of Senate and Convocation

Portada
Boydell Press, 2004 - 478 páginas
0 Opiniones
Las opiniones no están verificadas, pero Google revisa que no haya contenido falso y lo quita si lo identifica
In 1858 the University - in reality an examining board - opened its non-medical examinations to candidates irrespective of how they prepared themselves. At the same time, graduates could join the newly established Convocation, for four decades empowered to veto changes in the University's Charter, choose a quarter of the governing body the Senate, and, from 1868, elect the University's MP. This book analyses the delicate and often stressful relations of Senate and Convocation, covering the long struggle over admission of women to degrees; the contribution of the University to secondary education; the establishment of the University's seat in the House of Commons, and the subsequent elections of Members. Later chapters describe the extended campaign to change the institution into an orthodox university, and the political struggles and academic manoeuvring that attended the process. F.M.G. WILLSON has retired from an academic and administrative career in Zimbabwe, North America, London and Australia.
 

Comentarios de la gente - Escribir un comentario

No encontramos ningún comentario en los lugares habituales.

Contenido

The Senate
13
the Annual Committee
27
The political community
43
The ambitions of Charles James Foster
69
The campaign and defeat of Elizabeth Garrett
85
The General Examination for Women
98
The consequences of Gurneys Act
117
The final hurdle
140
Things falling apart
259
The Selborne Commission
273
Confusion worse confounded
285
A Charter rejected
298
One or two universities?
308
Neither Albert nor Gresham
323
The Cowper Commission
332
Anxiety and division in Convocation
348

Choosing Robert Lowe
155
Liberal into Liberal Unionist
169
THE UNIVERSITY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION
181
The schools lobby
183
Greek or Chemistry?
189
Inspection of schools
202
qualifications and registration
211
EXAMINING AND TEACHING THE LONG AND CROOKED ROAD TO COMPROMISE
219
The case for change
221
Convocations pursuit of power and reconstruction
227
One two or three universities?
243
Lions beaters and the fall of the Rosebery Government
367
The preemptive strike of Sir John Lubbock
382
The doubts of the Duke of Devonshire
396
The strength of bishops and provincials
405
A compromise refused
418
The insistence of Arthur Balfour
430
New era old divisions
446
Appendix
462
Index
465
Derechos de autor

Términos y frases comunes

Información bibliográfica