Imágenes de páginas
PDF

VI

Plate 18

Wh1te. — Inouye Inseki.
Black. — Yasui Shintetsu.

Played December, 1835. No handicaps were given. This game is from a Japanese work called "Kachi Sei Kioku." The notes are taken from Korschelt, and as in the previous instance involve the repetition of some things that have been touched on in the preceding chapters.

Black

1. R16.

3. Q.3. 6. C4.

7. Q.5. This may be the best play under the circumstances. The secure position Q.3-Q.5 supports the advance posts at C 4 and R 16 in equal measure.

9. P16.

11. Q.15. 13. P15. 16. R 14. 17. Q.13.

Wh1te

2. D 17.
4. P17.

6. C 14. Just as good as D 15,
which we already know.
8. Q.14.

10. Q.16.
12. Q.,7."
14. R 15.
16. S 15.

18. N 17. The eighth stone played at Q 14 cannot be saved. If White attempts to save it, the following would be the continuation:

[merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][merged small]

Japanese expression "Shicho.") 19. P 14. Takes. S 14 prob- 20. S 16. ably would have been better, because it would have retained the "Sente" for Black; that is to say, a play which the opponent is compelled to answer, or otherwise sustain too great a loss. Had Black played at S 14, White must have answered at S 16, in order not to lose the stones at R 15-S 15, and also the corner, which is worth about fourteen " Me." To White's play at S 16 Black would probably have answered at R 12 and thus obtained a secure position.

[ocr errors][graphic][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors]
[graphic][ocr errors]

Black Wh1te

31. C 9. 32. L 3. White has established

the long line on D and allowed Black a large territory in order to be able to occupy L 3. If he had played there immediately in answer to Black's twenty-third move, then either L 3 or E 3 would have been in great danger.

33. D3. 34. D2.

36. C2. 36. D4.

37. C 3. M. L 5.

39. F3. 40. F2.

41. E 4. Black compels White 42. E 2. to take 41, in order to make good his escape.

43. G3. 44. F4.

46. G4. 46. F5.

47. G5. 48. K2.

49. F6. "Sente." 50. E 5. Takes.

51. J 2. 52. H7.

53. H6. 64. G7.

66. J 7. 66. P3.

57. P4. 68. O3.

59. Q2. 60. O4.

61. O 5. 62. N 5.

63. O 6. 64. K 7. An interesting attack

that determines the course of the game for a long time. 65 J 8, would mean abandoning the position on G-J (26 "Me"), but it would give an opportunity for a bold attack. If Black played 65, J 6, his stones would scarcely survive.

66. K 3. "Sente." White must 66. L 2.

Black

reply to it, or he would find himself without the necessary "Me" in that group.

67. K6.

69. L6.

71. K5. Avoids "Ko" and nevertheless assures a connection. 73. L7.

76. J 5.

77. K8.
79. or
81. L9.
83. 0 8.
86. K 11.

87. Q.10. 89. R 11.

91. S 10. Takes.

93. R 10. Q.12 would probably have been better; at all events it would have been surer, because it assures the connection by way of Pll after White has taken. If White does not take, but plays at P 11, his stones on the edge of the board will die.

96. L 11.

97. L 14.
99. K 13.
101. K 14.
103. S 14.
106. T 15.

107. On. It is certain that

[ocr errors]

68. J 8.

70. J 6. Takes. 72. N6.

74. K 4. Is played for the same reason as No. 66. 76. N7. 78. J 7. 80. N8. 82. J 10. 84. N 10.

86. R 10. Now the effect of the mistake at move 19 begins to be apparent.

88. Q.11.

90. R 12.

92. S 11.

94. M 11. This move separates P 14 from K 11, and is at the same time "Sente" as regards the black stones near K, because if Black does not answer, these stones would be cut off by WK 10. Moves Nos. 98, 100, and 102 isolate the black stones in the neighborhood of P 14.

96. Q.12.

98. L13.

100. M 13.

102. M 14.

104. S 13.

106. N 15.

108. O 12.

« AnteriorContinuar »