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White

2. E 3.

4. R 4. White takes advantage of his opportunity and plays in another corner.

BLACK
1. C 4. “Komoku.”

3. J 3. "Sangen basami.” This move attacks the white stone but not so directly as the preceding variation. It is the invention of Honinbo Dosaku.

5. D 3. 7. B 6.

9. M 3. It will be seen in this variation that the stones are played farther apart than in the preceding “Joseki.”

11. H 2.

13. D 8. This is an important move for Black.

15. M 5.

6. E 4. 8. J 5. 10. H 3.

12. H 4. 14. O 3.

16. L 4. “Nozoku.” It threatens Black's connection on lines M and 3.

18. G 2.

17. L 3. If Black defends at M 4, White replies at K 2.

HITE

BLACK 19. J 2.

20. L 5. 21. M 4.

22. P 5.
This “ Joseki” really deals with two corners.

XXII

IITE

No HANDICAP

Plate 24 (D) Black 1. D 3. “Komoku."

2. C 5. C 9. "Sangen basami.” 4. C 3.

6. D 4. 7. E 3.

8. B 3. 9. E 4. Preparatory to ir at C 10. D 6. A good move. E 5 15; generally No. 9 is played at H 3. would be bad, because Black would

reply at D 6 with a better game. 11. C 15. (Not in diagram.)

5. C

We will now insert ten examples of openings, as distinguished from “ Joseki.” As already stated, these are by Murase Shuho. In these examples Black is supposed to make the best possible moves, and therefore White always finds himself at a disadvantage.

Plate 25
Black has a handicap of four stones.

WHITE 1. R 14.

2. Q 14. 3. Q 13

4. P 14.

ACK

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WHITE

5. R 15. 7. () 3.

9. P 13. 11. Q 15. 13. R 13 15. N 13

17. R 3.

BLACK 6. R 16.

8. R 10. Formerly in such a case as this Black played at R 7. This move replied to White's move at O 3 and at the same time from a distance attacked White's stones at R 14 and R 15. It is better to confine the last two stones by the text move.

10. R 12.
12. P 15.
14. P 16.

16. P 10. This move is better than R 7.

18. R 4. This move is better than Q.3, which although it cuts off 03 and R 3 would leave Black's stone at R 10 weak.

20. P 4.
22. N 5.
24. G 17.
26. N 16.

28. Q 18. Black is quite satisfied to have merely the necessary two “Me" in this corner, because he has a much larger territory to the left.

30. C 10.
32. 04.
34. 08.

19. Q.3. 21. P 3. 23. L 17. 25. () 17. 27. P 18.

29. J 17.
31. Q 6.

33. M 4. This move is better than ( 7 because Black could follow at N 3 in that case. Q6 is a "Sute ishi" or sacrificed stone. It has the effect of forcing Black to play 34 ()8, and later on will help

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WHITE still further to narrow down Black's territory. At the same time every attack on the Black position from the outside would be made more effective by the presence of this stone. Possibly it could also be used later in “Ko.” Black makes his 36th, 38th and 40th moves in order to secure his position which is weakened by the presence of the white stone at Q6.

35. F 3. 37. L 4. 39. K 5. 41. J 5. 43. G 4. 45. F 5. 47. G 3.

49. R 18. Beginners would play at S 16 or Q 17.

51. O 18.

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Plate 26
Black has a handicap of four stones.

WHITE 1. R 14.

2. Q 14. 3. Q 13.

4. P 14. 5. R 15.

6. R 16. 7. R 10.

8. K 17. 9. O 3.

10. G 3. 11. H 17.

12. F 17.

13. M 17.

14. O 17.

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