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Angell James, and William Jay.

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' a little trouble, it might be shown, that motives of economy, as well as good principle, "recommended the step referred to. Let the Christian people of England take this advice, and be at the same time prepared so to extend their schemes both of vernacular and English education, that government shall have no reason to complain, or the people to suffer. Let the solution of this long-standing grievance By this step be secured, and the Bible would be rid of its greatest obstacle of youtig India almost eftirely under its own influence.

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Titabu 12:02:52 96511720 ART VIII. 1, The Life and Letters of John ANGELL JAMES; -o including an Unfinished Autobiography. Edited by R. W.

M.A. his colleague and Successor. Second Edition. Huondon,

James Nisbet and Co. 1861, 2. The Autobiography of the Rev. WILLIAM JAY; with Reminis

fences of some distinguished Contemporaries, Selections from hohiso Correspondence, $co. London Hamilton, Adams, and

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The autobiographies of these two distinguished men differ considerably Neither of them can be said

to have been com pleted, but Mro. Jay's was more leisurely written than Mr.

It includes also what the latter is deficient in, notices of remarkable

harkable persons with whom the writer had been more or less acquainted, some of which are very interesting and valuable. Mr. Jay began his record at the instance of his children, and put it into the stiape of letters to them. As nearly as can be ascer tained, this was in 1843 after he had completed his seventyfourth year

When he had finished the first letter, Mr. James pajd him a visit, and, learning what he had in hand, greatly encouraged the attempt. Mindful perhaps of this conversation, and solicited by many friends, Mr. James undertook the same labour at about the same period of life, but appears to have had many misgivings as to his success, and to have soon abandoned the task Mr. Dale supplies the following introduction to the work

!!:-909 71 71 21:111: The Autobiographical Fragment found among the papers of the läte John Angell Tames was commenced in the autumn of 1858 laid aside before the end of the year. None S. Let the reader-imagine himself in a square room of moderate dimensións, comfortably furnished, bät without ostentation, a blazing

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fire on the bearth, the dark heavy curtains drawns and candles dati for an evening's work. The wall on your left. is covered with engravings of well-known,miņişters: you will recognise at once the majestie, firme and the ardent gaze, of Dr., M'All the most brilliant of madera

, , Jax the rùgged face of Chalmers; and the robust form and ample brow of large 61-paintings, one on each side of the fire place that on the right is an early portrait of Mr Tuines, the other of his secondi Wite, who has been dead mot for seventeen fears'a Dulo or three other fåoes which are dear to the oldh marr; writiugs at the table, lookodown upon him from above the mantielpiece:: and onna ibracket i fástened to the opposite :walrstands: the bust of his tutor, Dr. Boguerlajnogos ad

There is a couch, on 90e side of the fire, and on it there lies onę whose sufferings, protracted through many weary years, shave had much to do with her father's sanctity Now and thereas her

he looks his writing to speak a kind word to his child, you see in his countenance a massive strength and a winning gentleness, the sim; plicity of childhood í biended with manly. Shrewdness and mobility the mouth was made for eloquence; the broad wind ample mest Below is what you like to see in a popülår brator. His eyes arest the light blue bwnicbmmon now in Englands and brightenisas The speaks till they shed a positive illumination over his face. Bat the light passes away: and heitlns again to the page ibefore hima avviting swiftly and yetisunely, hardly, ever ipausing for a fward-boiburning back to garicel or gagrecta y He wsites like one who has writteni much, and who bas small anxiety about

the refipements of literaryart sdf he can make his meaning clear if his sentences susmoothly,land are tolerably accurate

and vigorouse he is, satisfied And pewaring the writer, I leave you for

a time to the manuscripto which

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bacte ou 15Mr.Jayiwas fortunate in having his manuscript editedi byo two brother ministers who had known kim, langa andwho possessed the double advantage of great ministerial experience and con. siderable practice in authorship. We do not impute it to Mr. Dale as a fault that none of these things can be predicated of him ji and we are not unmindful of the difficulties of this task. We only wish that the materjal he has accumulated with such laudable care had been more skilfully employed, and in particular that he had been mindful of Mr. James's just remark:

Even of the most distinguished men, biographical memorials are often too diffuse. It is too commonly thought that a great man's history must necessarily have a very great book." (Page 8.) A third edition will probably be much improved by the omission of certain passages, which Me. Dále hinself

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o The stod Autobiographies, s.

207 to have been inclined to remove from the second, if opportunity had been afforded him, those, namely, in reference to his own Deement; and we would suggest that the letters to Me church, his deacons

his deacons, afid his friends in America, might be, if mosando as s&uthey used

to say, into the narrative, réatly abridged ; or, better still

,

Best of all afferations, however, would be the condensation of the whole into a moderate sized volume, whiệh every minister might bụy and keep on his shelves for a Saturday book. Such a volume might be compiled from the present as should well answer this purposes and its compilation would be the most fitting tribute to MrutaJames's memory inasmuch as his memoir would thus be accomplishing a purpose most dear to his heart; in assisting to promotes the usefulness of Christian ministers from generation Rogerêratiðh", 71897 Por sigured bainsunt mua 2017

But notwithstahaing the necessity and capability of interproté. ment on which we have remarkea, we hoid' that Mr. Dale has produced a valuable Book It is a faithful portrait, thoughof somewhat foo, Jarge 4 size, and too cumbrously, framed

Thé book, is true. The impression, with which we, rise from its perusa) is in accordance with our personal knowledge, so far as it went, and with the facts of history. And on doctrinal gubjects the tone is sound and clear, while the style throughout isi i nigorous and compaộtiz. Many a good man- has been 7 twice bariedjatin his grave and it his biography and it is becausemé åte sure that Mr. Dales has it in his power 40 preserve bur Beļóved friend from such "a" fate' that we urge upon him the abridgment or feconstruction of the volume Before us.

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Dy twoch bitkat dach left an autobiography was but one of tke many resemblances between the two remarkable men whose names here stand together. Each was a Dissenter of the Independent denomination, uneither of them arnoisy or a violent Disselter. Both were highly popular pretehers, attracting large congtega: tions wherever they wenta 1 Both for a time statedly preached London, and thus secured a metropolitan'as well as a provincial tephtationzi but both remained i pastors of country Churches. Hach eompleted half a century in the service of one Church, and delebrated áojabilee with his congregation Both were highly suocessfuluauthore their writings o carrying binstruction e atid : omon201 ! Ilio lobula 115941 bound iniy kinait alui Bábilftidy bööktuku a' phrase ubed by the tenerable tohtni Clayton' of 'thes

' Weigh Hnuse (the father jof thpedi distinguished preachers, John, George, and wufam, y to deplete books by the use of which ministers might be assisted to bring their minds rinto harmonizing to some extent with and engagements of the coming

castomed to call them Saturday afternooi books,aģd his list who made of steckt hooks af Bašter's Reformed Piston bütésée after, p. 28: 110

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delight far beyond the range of their noble voices. Mr. Jay republished his works in twelve volumes during his life, but takes care to inform his readers that the credit of the edition is due to his son ; Mr. James's son (who is, we believe, like Mr. Jay's, a solicitor) announces himself as the editor of his father's collected works, in eleven volumes. Both these great preacher's made their way to distinction and usefulness in spite of early disadvantages; and they are among the best examples of 'selfhelp' which our age has produced, for they neither proudly omitted to invoke the highest aid, nor forgot to put forth their own strenuous endeavours. Each was prayerful, each laborious, each achieved success of no common order.

James was born at Blandford Forum in 1785, and received the name of Angell in honour of his mother's aunt, who left her four thousand pounds. His father, who appears never to have exercised much influence over him, attended the Independent Meeting, and at the close of his life became a member of the Church. His mother was a General or Arminian Baptist; but for lack of a Baptist place of worship in the town, accompanied her husband, she found, however, little spiritual life among the Independents, and, weary of the coldness and formality of the services at the Meeting, often attended the Methodist preaching, and found there,' says Mr. Dale, 'less polish and more power: After four years spent in two poor schools, he was, in his thirteenth or fourteenth year, apprenticed to a draper at Poole. Here his religious life began. The instrument of his awakening was a fellow-apprentice who, on the first night he came, knelt by his bedside, in the presence of all the other inmates of the room, and prayed before he slept. This apprentice was in the habit of going out, when the shop was shut, to call upon a pious cobbler, for purposes of religious improvement. Young James, whose conscience was thus awakened, asked leave to join them; was admitted to the fellowship of their conversations and prayers ; and from that time came more and more under good influ. ences; and never looked back, though the man to whom he owed his good impressions did. The old cobbler and his wife were kind to him; lent him good books; and encouraged him to pray, little thinking that the timid and volatile youth with whom they were so much grieved when he went once to a ball, and once to a play, would in a few years be one of the most popular and useful ministers in England. We are glad this portion of the history has been preserved; for the encouragement it supplies to private, personal labour in the cause of Christ is invaluable. But for John Poole we might never have had Angell James.

James's early religious History.

209 * We have much desired a more full and clear account of Mr. James's conversion. That he was unable, at the distance of sixty years, to remember the details, is the apology suggested by Mr. Dale for the meagreness of the chapter in the Autobiography relating to the subject; and it is the only probable ones for really he tells us little or nothing, save that the little company which met at John Poole's increased ; that James grew increasingly serious, and was often impressed, under the word preached, particularly by the semmons of Mr. Durant that he attended prayer-meetings, regularly, and gladly, and became ia Sunday-school teacher. Of his coming to Christy, closing with Him, and relying upon Him, there is not one words. He did not join the church at Ppole, nor was he even invited to join it; though he was invited to preach in a village congregation, and

had some intention of doing so. He has recorded his love and practice of prayer; but beyond this scarcely any signs of grace appear in him when we find him on his way to Gosport to study, for the ministry. He appears to have been sent under the stimulus which Mr. Robert Haldane's liberality gave to the Hampshire Independents through Mr. Bennett of Romsey. I, said he will give a hundred pounds per annum. Do you raise two hundred, and we can thus provide for the education of ten young men for the Christian ministry, allowing them thirty pounds each. A noble proposition How far it was responded to, and how long the contribution was continued, we are not informed; but the money was well spent if it did no more than bring Angell James into the work of the ministry, and save him from the secularities of a draper's shop, from which, however, his father was loth to release him.

We bring together here a few extracts from the Autobiography relative to this period of his history..

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The little circle, at the shoemaker's was enlarged by two more young men, who were permitted to join us. We usually all met

a Sabbath evening after sermon at his house for prayer aud praise, and very sweet and sacred were the seasons we there spent. It was the vernal season of my religious life, when all was lively and budding. I now attended an early prayer-meeting on a Sunday morning at the vestry before breakfast, and occasionally eng&ged in prayer, though I believe with more fervour than correcto

The sermons seemed very solemn and interesting to me, and religious exercises in general very delightful.". My religious affections were very strong, but my knowledge limited. I, of course, understood that I was to be saved from my sins by Christ; yet I had very crude notions of justification and other great doctrines of the New Testament. I was now thoroughly engaged to the

ness.

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