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Palliser Model Homes: Showing a Variety of Schaff (Ph.)-Through Bible Lands: Notes of

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THE SAMHITOPANISH ADBRĀHMAŅA

(Being the Seventh Brāhmaṇa) of the

SĀMA VEDA.

THE SANSKRIT TEXT. With a Commentary, an Index of Words, etc.

Edited by A. C. BURNELL, Ph. D.

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Edited in Sanskrit by A. C. BURNELL, Ph. D.
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MUSIC,

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INDIAN WORKS ON Ν

RECENTLY IMPORTED. LIST OF MUSICAL WORKS AND COMPILATIONS BY

SOURINDRO MOHUN TAGORE, Mus. Doc.;

Founder and President of the Bengal Music School. VICTORIA-GITIKX, or Sanskrit Verses, celebrating the deeds and the virtues of Her Most

Gracious Majesty The Queen Victoria and her renowned Predecessors. Composed and set to Music by SOURINDRO

MOHUN TAGORE, President Bengal Music School. With a Translation. 8vo. pp. 350. Calcutta, 1875. 85. FIFTY STANZAS IN SANSCRITA, in Honour of H.R.H. the Prince of Wales. Composed and

set to Music by S. M. TAGORE. 8vo. pp. 147. Calcutta, 1875. 45. ENGLISH VERSES SET TO HINDU MUSIC, in Honour of H.R.H. the Prince of Wales.

By S. M. TAGORE. 8vo. pp. 156. Calcutta, 1875. 45. HINDU MUSIC FROM VARIOUS AUTHORS. Compiled by S. M. TAGORE. Part I. (for

private circulation only). 8vo, pp. 315. Calcutta, 1875. 75. 60. THE MUSIC AND MUSICAL NOTATION OF VARIOUS COUNTRIES. By Loke Nath

GHOSE. 8vo. pp. 55. Calcutta, 1874. MUSIC'S APPEAL TO INDIA, an original, instructive and interesting Story. By LOKE NATH

GHOSE. 8vo. pp. 24. With Frontispiece. Calcutta, 1873. HINDU MUSIC. Reprinted from the Hindoo Patriot. 8vo. pp. 50. Calcutta, 1874. Is. 6d. YANTRA KOSHA, or a Treasury of the Musical Instruments of Ancient and Modern India, and

of various other Countries. By S. M. TAGORE. 8vo. pp. 296. Calcutta, 1875. 7s. 6d. SANGITA SARA SANGRAHA (Sanskrit Verses). By S. M. TAGORE. 8vo. pp. 273. Calcutta,

1876. 75. 64. HARMONIUM-SUTRA, or a Treatise on Harmonium. By S. M. TAGORE, (Bengali.) 8vo.

pp. 79. Calcutta, 1874. 25. 6d. MRIDUNGA MUNJOREE. A Treatise on Mridunga. By S. M. TAGORE. (Bengali.) 8vo.

Pp. 210. Calcutta, 1873. 5s. BAHOOLINA TATWA, or a Treatise on “ Violin." By KALYPADA MUKHOPADHYA. (Bengali.)

8vo. Pp. 170. Calcutta, 1874. 55. KANTHA KAUMUDI, or a Guide to Vocal Music, comprising all the necessary rules and methods

for the cultivation of the Voice, with a variety of Songs, Maps, etc. Compiled and composed by Khetra MOHANA

GOSVAMI. (Bengali.) 8vo. pp. 403. Calcutta, 1875. 8s. JOTIYA SASDITA VISHAYAKA PRASTABA. (Bengali.) 4to. pp. 80. Calcutta, 1874. 25. 6d. AEKATANA, OR THE INDIAN CONCERT. By S. M. TAGORE. 4to. pp. 48. Calcutta. 25. 6d. A VEDIC HYMN. Published by S. M. TAGORE. Folio, pp. 6. Calcutta, 1876. Is. 6d. A FEW LYRICS OF OWEN MEREDITH. Set to Hindu Music by S. M. TAGORE. 8vo. Pp. 100.

Calcutta, 1877. 55. BHARATIYA NATYA RAHASYA, or a Treatise on Hindu Drama. By S. M. Tagore. (Bengali.)

16mo. pp. 40 and 238. Calcutta, 1868. 55. PUBLIC OPINION AND OFFICIAL COMMUNICATIONS ABOUT THE BENGAL MUSIC

SCHOOL AND ITS PRESIDENT (S. M. TAGORE). 8vo. pp. 4 and 186. Calcutta, 1876. 5s. SIX PRINCIPAL RAGAS, with a brief view of Hindu Music. By S. M. TAGORE. Second

Edition. 4to. With 6 Lithograph Plates (Sarasvati, Basantha, Bhairaba, Paņchama, Megha, and Natta Narayana), and 106 pages Text. Calcutta, 1877. 155.

"THE MYSTERY of Hindu MusiC consists largely in its sruta, or minute intervals, distinctly perceptible to an Indian ear, but which the duller European organism fails to appreciate. There are twenty-two kinds of sruti to each sapłaka, or octave, the compass of the Hindu scale being limited to three octaves of seven notes each. Strictly speaking, it is understood that no human voice can compass more than two and a half saptakas, and that consequently has become the limit of instrumental music. A sruti is a quarter tone, or the third of a tone, according to its position in the scale. In the arrangerents of intervals it is admitted that Sanskrit writers were not mathematically accurate, but on the other hand it is contended ibat "sense" and a "well-cultivated ear" are more necessary than mathematics for the comprehension of music.

In number the Hindu notes are the same as those of Western nations, and their initial letters serve to exhibit the gamut or saptaka which, though called an octave, has actually only seven notes, sa, ri, ga, ma, pa, dha, ni. These various gradations of sound, are supposed to have been derived from the cries of animals and the songs of birds. The first, sa, say the Sanskrit writers, " was imitated from the call of the peacock," the second, ri, from the bellowing of the ox," the third, ga, from the bleating of the goat," the fourth, ma," from the howling of the jackal, or from the voice of the crane," the fifth, pa, " from the call of the blackbird, called kokhila," the sixth, dha, " from the sound of the frog, or from the neighing of the horse," and the seventh, mi, “from the voice of the elephant.". The imitations are happily more melodious than the originals.

The difference between the vikrita swaragrama of the Hindus (the seven notes of the saptaka form twelve vikritas) and the English chromatic scale lies in this--that the former proceeds by semi-tones and srutis, and the latter by a regular succession of semi-tones. The early Sanskrit writers ranged the notes under four castes --Brahmans, Kshatriyas, Vaisyas, and Sudras-corresponding to the major tones, minor tones, semi-tones, and chromatic notes of Western music. The predominant character of Hindu music being melody, harmony is regarded as altogether insignificant, though occasionally used for quite exceptional purposes."--Pall Mail Gazette, Oct, 17, 1876.

LONDON : TRÜBNER & CO., 57 AND 59 LUDGATE HILL.

.

TRÜBNER'S ORIENTAL SERIES. MESSRS. TRÜBNER & Co. beg to call attention to their ORIENTAL SERIES, in which will be collected, as far as possible, all extant information and research upon the History, Religions, Languages, Literature, &oc., of Ancient India, China, and the East in general.

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The following Works are now Ready:

VOL. I. Second Edition. Post Svo., cloth, pp. xvi. and 427. Price 16s. ESSAYS ON THE SACRED LANGUAGE, WRITINGS, AND RELIGION OF THE PARSIS.

BY MARTIN HAUG, Ph.D., Late of the Universities of Tübingen, Göttingen, and Bonn ; Superintendent of Sanskrit Studies, and Professor of Sanskrit in the Poona College ; Honorary Member of the Bombay Branch Royal Asiatic Society, etc.

Edited by Dr. E. W. WEST. Essay I.—History of the Researches into the Sacred Writings and Religion of the Parsis, from the Earliest Times down

to the Present. - II. Languages of the Parsi Scriptures.—III. The Zend-Avesta, or the Scripture of the

Parsis.-IV. The Zoroastrian Religion, as to its Origin and Development. The author's principal object in publishing these Essays, originally, was to present in a readable form all the materials for judging impartially of the scriptures and religion of the Parsis. The same object has been kept in view while preparing this Second Edition, giving a large quantity of such materials, collected from a variety of sources, which may now be left to the reader's impartial judgment.

The value of this Second Edition is greatly enhanced by the addition of many posthumous papers, discovered by the editor, Dr. E. West, at Munich. They consist of further translations from the Zend and Pahlavi of the Zend-Avesta, and also of numerous detailed notes descriptive of some of the Parsi ceremonies.

VOL. II.
Post Svo., cloth, pp. viii. and 176. Price 75. 6d.
TEXTS FROM THE BUDDHIST

BUDDHIST CANON
COMMONLY KNOWN AS

DH A M M A P AD A. Translated from the Chinese by S. BEAL, B.A., Professor of Chinese, University College, London. Among the great body of books comprising the Chinese Buddhist Canon, presented by the Japanese Government to the Library of the India Office, Mr. Beal discovered a work bearing the title of “ Law Verses, or Scriptural Texts, which on examination was seen to resemble the Pali version of Dhammapada in many particulars. It was further discovered that the original recension of the Pali Text found its way into China in the Third Century Anno Domini, where the work of translation was finished, and afterwards thirteen additional sections added. The Dhammapada, as hitherto known by the Pali Text edition, as edited by Fausböll, by Max Müller’s English, and Albrecht Weber's German translations, consists only of twenty-six chapters or sections, whilst the Chinese version or rather recension, as now translated by Mr. Beal, consists of thirty-nine sections. The students of Pali who possess Fausböll's Text, or either of the abovenamed translations, will therefore needs want Mr. Beal's English rendering of the Chinese version; the thirteen abovenamed additional sections not being accessible to them in any other form : for, even if they understand Chinese, the Chinese original would be unobtainable by them.

VOL. III.

Post 8vo., pp. xxiii. and 360, cloth. Price 18s.
THE HISTORY OF INDIAN LITERATURE,

BY ALBRECHT WEBER.
Translated from the German by JOHN MANN, M. A., and THEODOR ZACHARIAE, Ph.D.

With the sanction of the author. Dr. BUHLER, Inspector of Schools in India, writes :-"I am extremely glad to learn that you are about to publish an English Translation of Professor A. Weber's · History of Indian Literature.' When I was Professor of Oriental Languages in Elphinstone College, I frequently felt the want of such a work to which I could refer the students. I trust that the work which you are now publishing will become a class-book in all the Indian Colleges, as it is the first and only scientific one which deals with the whole field of Vedic, Sanskrit, and Prakrit literature."

Professor Cowell, of Cambridge, writes :—"The English translation of Professor A. Weber's History of Indian Literature' will be of the greatest use to those who wish to take a comprehensive survey of all that the Hindoo mind has achieved. It will be especially useful to the students in our Indian Colleges and Universities. I used to long for such a book when I was teaching in Calcutta. Hindu students are intensely interested in the history of Sanskrit literature, and this volume will supply them with all they want on the subject. I hope it will be made a text-book wherever Sanskrit and English are taught."

Professor WHITNEY, Yale College, Newhaven, Conn., U.S.A., writes :—"I am the more interested in your enterprise of the publication of Weber's Sanskrit Literature in an English version, as I was one of the class to whom the work was originally given in the form of Academic Lectures. At their first appearance they were by far the most learned and able treatment of their subject; and with their recent additions, they still maintain decidedly the same rank. Wherever the language, and institutions, and history of India are studied, they must be used and referred to as authority.”

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Trübner's Oriental Series, continued.

VOL. IV.
Post Svo., cloth, pp. xii. and 198. Accompanied by Two Language Maps. Price 125.
MODERN LANGUAGES OF THE EAST INDIES.

BY ROBERT CUST. The Author has attempted to fill up a vacuum, the inconvenience of which pressed itself on his notice. Much had been written about the languages of the East Indies, but the extent of our present knowledge had not even been brought to a focus. Information on particular subjects was only to be obtained or looked for by consulting a specialist, and then hunting down the numbers of a serial or the chapters of a volume not always to be found. It occurred to him that it might be of use to others to publish in an arranged form the notes which he had collected for his own edification. Thus the work has grown upon him. THE FOLLOWING WORKS ARE IN PREPARATION.

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After the translation of the “ Arabian Nights” was finished, Lane, since he could not be idle, arranged a volume of “ Selections from the Ku-ran,” with an introduction, notes, and an interwoven commentary. The book did not appear till 1813, when its author was in Egypt and unable to correct the proofs, consequently it is defaced by considerable typographical errors, and its publication in that state was a continual source of annoyance to Lane. The notion was an excellent one. He wished to collect together all the important doctrinal parts of the Ku-ran, in order to show what the religion of Mohammad really was according to the Prophet's own words; and be omitted all those passages which weary or disgust the student, and render the Ku-ran an impossible book for general reading. The result is a small volume, which gives the ordinary reader a very fair notion of the contents of the Ku-ran, and of the circumstances of its origin. In this latter part of the subject there is, however, room for that addition and improvement which thirty years of continued progress in Oriental research could not fail to make needful; and such alteration will be made in the new edition, which is presently to be published.-Life of Edward William Lane, pp. 96 and 97.

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