Imágenes de páginas
PDF
EPUB

CONTENTS

CHAP. II.

The Sault-Dissolute character of the population-Lecture on Fishes
of the Sault-The black fly-Lecture on the Classification of Birds-
Embarcation on Lake Superior-Canoes-Canadian voyageurs and In-
dians—The Pointe aux Pins—Voyageur's bread-Entrance of the lake
-Resemblance to the sea-coast-Les gens du Lac-Arrangement of the
messes-Routine of the day-Provisions—Drift-scratches and grooves

- Mineralogical remarks by the Professor-Grand scenery of the lake
-Catching the lake trout-Character of rocks and trees-Great va-
riations of temperature-Coldness of the water-Mica Bay-Hospitality
of Capt. Matthews-A proof of the “Glacial Theory”—Montreal River
-Large red pinesTamias quadrivittatus—Indian pictures— Transpa-
rency of the water—Cautiousness of the voyageurs-Boat songs-
Fishing Indians—Toad River-Character of river-mouths on the lake

- Increasing grandeur of the scenery-Brilliancy of the lichens-
Agate Bay—Indian legend— Cape Choyye-Pot-holes-Snow-Michi-
picotin River-The factory—The plague of flies—Indian hunters-

[ocr errors]

The fur trade-Climate_The fisheries-Our voyageurs—Terraces—Riv.
a la Chienne- An Indian tombstone-Les Ecrits-Character of the
woods—Cliffs-Otter Head-A cedar swamp-Alteration of temperature
- The Northern Lights—The Pic-Birds and fishes—One of the party
ill with fever-Drowned insects-Pic Island-Fires in the woods-
Caribous-Parus Hudsonicus-Terraces—The Professor's remarks on
Metallic Veins-Les Petits Ecrits—Islands—An Indian Family-Usnea
-St. Ignace-Deserted Mining Location-Ascent of Mt. Cambridge-
Furrows on the beaches-Masses of lichen-Ripple marks--Thunder
Cape—Fort William—The Kaministiquia River-The Fort-Aquatic
Cows–Excursion to Kakabcka Falls-Paddles and oars—The river-
A Dêcharge-Character of the interior of this region-Heavy dew-
The Falls

..... 31-89

CHAP. IV.

Description of Lake Superior-Steamer for Sturgeon Bay-Scenery of
the St. Mary's Straits— The Bruce Mine-Miners injured by an explosion
-St. Joseph's—Remarkable boulder-Observations on it by the Profes-
sor— The Theologico-geological question mooted—The Grand Manitou-
lin-The " presents” to the Indians-Gross injustice of the present sys-
tem-Penetanguishene-Sturgeon Bay-A rough road-Change in veg-

etation-Cold Water-Lake Simcoe-Holland landing-St. Albans-
Country on the Toronto road— Toronto-Lockport-Remarkable drift
groove-Home..

123-133

THE NORTHERN VEGETATION COMPARED WITH THAT OF THE JURA AND THE ALPS.

OBSERVATIONS ON THE VEGETATION OF THE NORTHERN SHORES OP LAKE SUPERIOR.

CLASSIFICATION OF ANIMALS FROM EMBRYONIC AND PALEOZOIC DATA.
Internal structure an insufficient basis for classification, 191-2.-

Embryonic features of various animals, as denoting a respectively inferior

rank, 193-200...

..191-200

Geographical distribution; the prevalence of general laws over

mere peculiarities of position and circumstances, 246-7.-Migrating

animals do not wander, but regularly return; light thrown on the

question of unity or plurality of creations by the examination of the

fishes of Lake Superior, 248.—Examination of the question whether

the Petromyzons should form a subclass by themselves, or be classed

with the skates and sharks, and conclusion that they are simply embry-

onic forms of the latter type, 249–52.—Description of Ammocætes

borealis, 252–4.–LEPIDOSTEUS, as showing the reptilian character of the

ancient fishes, 254–63.—The sturgeons; their geographical distribution,

263-4.-Circumscribed within narrow limits in various parts of the

world, yet linked together by intermediate forms; peculiarity of their

distribution in America, 265-6.- Acipenser lævis, Agass., 267-71.-A.

carbonarius, Agass., 271-6.-A. rynchæus, Agass., 276–7.-A. Rupertianus,

277-8.-On the position of the Siluridæ and Goniodonts as aberrant

families of the order of Ganoids, 278-9.-The genus PIMELODUS; proba-

bly to be further subdivided; remarks on several species, 279-80.-

P. felis, Agass., 281-4.-Genus Percopsis, Agass., representative of an

ancient type of the tertiary period; intermediate between Percoids and

Salmonidæ, 284-5.-P. guttatus, Agass., 286-9.–PERCOIDS ; great dif..

ference in their distribution, between Lake Superior and the Lower

Lakes, 289-91.-Observations on Perca flavescens, 291-3.-On Pomotis

vulgaris, 293.—Lucioperca Americana ; value of the opercular spines as

distinctive mark in this genus, 294-5.—Grystes fasciatus, Agass., 295-7.

Huro nigricans, Cuv., a Grystes, 297.—Cottoids ; importance of correct

appreciation of the connecting character, rather than the amount of

external variation, in classification, 297-8.–Subfamily of ETHEOSTOMATA ;

ETHEOSTOMA; PILEOMA; PÆCILOSOMA, Agass., BOLEOSOMA, 298-9.-Cor-

TUS; character of genus ; various opinions as to number of species,

300.-C. Richardsoni, Agass., 300-3.-C. Franklini, Agass., 303–4.-

Boleosoma, characters of, 304.-B. maculatum, Agass., 305-7.-PILEOMA;

characters of this genus, 307–8.-P. zebra, Agass., 308–10.—Gasterosteus

nebulosus, Agass., 310-14.-G. Pygmeus, Agass., 314-15.–Family

EsociDÆ, 315–17.-Esox boreus, Agass., 317–21.-Family Gadoids ; ob-

scurity of their real affinities; disagreements and uncertainties as to

certain North American genera and species, 321-4.-Lota maculosa,

[ocr errors]

DESCRIPTION OF SOME NEW SPECIES OF REPTILES FROM THE REGION OP LAKE SUPERIOR.

Striking scarcity of birds and quadrupeds ; causes of this, 383-4.-List

of species, 384-5....

.. 383–385

THE ERRATIC PHENOMENA ABOUT LAKB SUPERIOR.

The most minute and careful investigation of drift by the glacialists ;
whereas their opponents simply deny, 396.—The various erratic basins

« AnteriorContinuar »