Imágenes de páginas
PDF
EPUB

AMERICAN, EUROPEAN, & ORIENTAL LITERARY RECORD

A Register of the most important Works Published in North and South America,

India, China, Europe, and the British Colonies ;

With Occasional Notes on German, Dutch, Danish, French, Italian, Spanish,

Portuguese, Russian, and Hungarian Literature,

LOT

[blocks in formation]

Messrs. TRUBNER & Co., 57 and 59, Ludgate Hill, London, have imported, or can supply, all Works mentioned in this Literary Record. Intending purchasers having any difficulty in procuring them, should communicate direct with the Publishers of it. It would be imprudent to import many works in large quantities; but all specified can be supplied if a reasonable time be allowed, e.ccepting those containing copyright matter, or in any way infringing British copyright law.

AGENTS: STRASSBURG : KARL I. TRÜBNER, 9, MÜNSTERPLATZ.

SHANGHAI: KELLY AND Co. LEIPZIG : F. A. BROCKHAUS.

DUTCH EAST INDIES: J. H. DE BUSSY, SPUISTRAAT, PARIS: E. LEROUX, 28. RUE BUONAPARTE.

AMSTERDAM. THE HAGUE: MARTINUS NIJHOFF.

[ocr errors]

Messrs. TrÜBNER & Co. are the appointed Agents for the Sale of the following Official and other

Authorized Publications. Publications of Her Majesty's Stationery Office under the Direction ofTHE WAR OFFICE_THE MASTER OF THE ROLLS-The MASTER OF THE ROLLS IN IRELAND- -THE LORD CLERK REGISTRAR OF SCOTLAND- -THE LORDS OP H.M. PRIVY COUNCIL THE LORDS OF H.M. TREASURYThe LORDS OF THE ADMIRALTY-The Civil SERVICE COMMISSIONERS—THE GEOLOGICAL SURVEY OF GREAT BRITAIN AND IRELAND- -THE HOME OFFICE—The REGISTRAR OF TRADE MARKS-The OFFICE OF LAND REGISTRY-H.M. EMIGRATION COMMISSIONERS- -THE MUSEUM OF PRACTICAL GEOLOGY.

THE TRUSTEES OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM—THE GOVERNMENT OF INDIA-THE GOVERNMENT OF MADRAS -THE GOVERNMENT OF BOMBAY-THE GEOGRAPHICAL DEPARTMENT OF THE INDIA OFFICE-THE GEOLOGICAL SURVEY OF INDIA —THE ARCHÆOLOGICAL SURVEY OF INDIA—The ARCHÆOLOGICAL SURVEY OF WESTERN India

-The INDIAN METEOROLOGICAL OFFICE—The TRUSTEES OF THE INDIAN MUSEUM—THE GOVERNMENT OF NEW SOUTH WALES—THE GOVERNMENT OF VICTORIA THE GOVERNMENT OF NEW ZEALAND-THE ROYAL ASIATIC SOCIETY OF GREAT BRITAIN AND IRELAND-THE ASIATIC SOCIETY OF BENGAL-THE BOMBAY BRANCH OF THE ROYAL ASIATIC SOCIETY—THE CEYLON BRANCH OF The Royal Asiatic SOCIETY—THE NORTH CHINA BRANCH OF THE ROYAL ASIATIC SOCIETY—THE STRAITS BRANCH OF THE ROYAL ASIATIC SOCIETY-THE ASIATIC SOCIETY OF JAPAN—The ROYAL SOCIETY-THE ROYAL SOCIETY OF New South WALES—The LINNEAN SOCIETY Of New South WALES—THE COMMITTEE OF THE PALESTINE EXPLORATION FUND - The Early ENGLISH TEXT SOCIETY-THE ENGLISH DIALECT SOCIETY-THE ANTHROPOLOGICAL INSTITUTE OF GREAT BRITAIN AND IRELAND

-THE BALLAD SOCIETY—The CHAUCER SOCIETY - -THE BRITISH ARCHÆOLOGICAL ASSOCIATION -THE DANTE SOCIETY (U.S.A.)The New SHARSPERE SOCIETY—The PhiloLOGICAL SOCIETY—The ICELANDIC SOCIETY THE SOCIETY OF BIBLICAL ARCHÆOLOGY--The SANSKRIT TEXT SOCIETY—The ROYAL SOCIETY OF LITERATURE -THE BROWNING SOCIETY -The Society OP HEBREW LITERATURE—THE GEOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF GLASGOW

-THE BRITISH HOMEOPATHIC SOCIETY—THE CAMBRIDGE PhiloLOGICAL SOCIETY- -THE SUNDAY SOCIETY
THB SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTE- -THE AMATEUR MECHANICAL SOCIETY- -THE AMERICAN AGRICULTURAL ASSOCIATION

THE PSYCHICAL SOCIETY.
January-April, 1883.

?.

Z

LITERARY INTELLIGENCE. THE UNITED STATES TARIFF AND LITERATURE. Asia. The Collection was arranged by the late Professor H. Although the Tariff Commission recommended a reduction

H. Wilson, and the catalogue publisbed in 2 volumes in 1828;

this catalogue has long been out of print, and when met with of ten per cent. on printed books, and that all books, both those printed in foreign languages as well as English, should

fetches a very high price. The constant demand for it has bear a uniform duty of fifteen per cent., and that books which

induced Messrs. Higginbotham & Co., of Madras, to reprint had been printed over ten years should be duty free, this

it in one handy 8vo. volume, to which they have prefixed a recommendation was not adopted by Congress, and the duties

brief outline of the Life of Col. Mackenzie. Messrs. Higginon books remain the same as in the old Tariff. A reduction

botham intend, if this reprint meets with sufficient patronage, of ten per cent., it is true, would not have made foreign

to print as a companion volume to it the Rev. Wm. Taylor's authors' own editions of their works much more accessible

able reports on the portion of the Mackenzie Collection

transferred to the Madras Government from Calcutta. to the masses, but it would have been a step in the right direction; as it is, the United States Government must still REPORTS ON SANSKRIT MSS.- We have received three labour under the imputation of being a protector of pirates. very important Reports connected with the search for Sanskrit In England we long since came to the conclusion that all Manuscripts in India. Professor R. G. Bhandarkar makes taxes on knowledge were unpolitic, and there is now a memo- one to K. M. Chatfield, Esq., Director of Public Instruction rial fund in process of formation to commemorate the abolition at Poona, on work done in 1881-2 in the Maratha country, of the paper duty and the advertisement tax, and to do honour the Haiderabad Territory, and Berar. In this report he to the memory of the man who agitated till they were gives a list of many rare MSS. on the Vedas and Vedangas at abolished. One most amusing incident connected with the Poona, in one place he obtained a set of twelve of the most proposed reduction of the duty on books was that three well- important Purầnas. Besides these, the learned Professor known literary men, viz., Dr. Oliver Wendell Holmes, Mr. gives lists of many interesting MSS. on Grammar, Astronomy, Whittier, and Mr. T. B. Aldrich petitioned the Senate against and Astrology.-Pandit Kashi Nath Kunte, compiler of the it on the ground, firstly, " that Ainerica should not be flooded Catalogue of Sanskrit MSS., Punjaub, makes a report for the with cheap books," and secondly, "that the minds of Ameri- quarter ending Dec. 31, 1880, to Lieut.-Col. W. R. M. cans, and especially of American children, should not be per- Holroyd, Director of Public Instruction, Punjaub, of work verted by foreign ideas.". Now a fifteen per cent. duty is a done in relation to the preservation and collection of heavy duty, although a lighter one than twenty-five, and Sanskrit MSS. in the Punjaub. In this report he states he would still keep much literature out of the country ; butun- las catalogued 550 Sanskrit MSS., 326 belonging to the fortunately for this plea, America is already flooded with Library of Pandit Jwala Datta Prasáda, grandson of Pandit cheap books, and these cheap books interfere with the second Madhusudana deceased, and 224 to that of Pandit Bhagaplea these gentlemen advance; they are all pirated editions of wán Dás, Assistant Professor, Government College, Lahore. foreign authors, and have been perverting the American mind This latter library contains 400 books in all, of which 224 are ever since the declaration of Independence in an increasing MSS., none of which are older, however, than the sixteenth ratio. Had the second plea been advanced by natives of century. It is stated that the owner of this library often had China or Corea against the introduction of foreign books a congregation of 2000 men at his door to hear him expound into either of those countries, there would have been some the Puranas. In the course of this report Pandit Kashi consistency in it; but the United States as a nation is only a Kunte gives some interesting facts which he has collected on little over a century old, and is largely indebted to foreign the Jáina religion, claimed to be older than Buddhism, Jaina immigration for its inhabitants, which element increases Deva, the founder, being said to be the father of the Buddha. yearly, and to foreign knowledge for its literature.

This view was taken by the Brahmanas of old; though Jain TRIBUTE PAID TO GERMAN ORIENTAL SCHOLARSHIP IN scholars do not agree with this view, but take Jina to mean CALCUTTA.-I am sure that I am right in mentioning, among

Conqueror, and that the Jainas were the suppressors of all the interesting occurrences of the year, the arrival among us other religions but their own.-The third Report before us is of such an eminent European scholar as the Tagore Professor of also by Pandit Kashi Nath Kunte on the Sanskrit MSS. Law in this University. * It would be difficult to over-estimate examined and catalogued by him during 1881-2. The work the obligation which the cause which we all have at heart, of the year amounted to an examination of 1606 MSS. the cause of truth and light and progress, owes to the scholars compared to 2300 in the previous year, but the Pandit of Germany. The three great literatures of the ancient accounts for the difference by his being on privileged leave world, the Hebrew, the Sanskrit, and the Greek, alike bave searching for libraries and inducing their owners to show him found in Germany their most laborious students, and their their books. He had hopes of gaining access to the Delhi most able expositors. The names of Ewald, of Bopp, of Digambari Jaina libraries, but was put off with various Hermann, are household words in every country in which excuses; but he does not despair of ultimately gaining his learning is held in honour. Those great men have passed object. The MSS. in the libraries the Pandit was able to away, but their spirit survives, and in the distinguished examine and catalogue range from the 15th to the 19th scholar whom we have been glad to welcome among us this centuries. year, we find no unworthy successor of the illustrious person- A MONUMENT FOR THE LATE MR. SCHWENDLER. - The ages whom I have named. In his address last year our

Committee and Members of the Zoological Gardens, Calcutta, Chancellor told us that we were then celebrating the Silver

have decided to erect a Monument to the late Electrician to Wedding of the East and West. Surely the closeness of

the Telegraph Department. As these Gardens were brought the bond between the two is strongly evidenced when we see a Professor of the University of Würtzburg delivering

into existence chietly through Mr. Schwendler's efforts, and as

many of the animals were presented by him from his private to a Calcutta audience a course of lectures established under the will of an Indian Brahmin.-Extract from the

collection, they are thought to be the most appropriate site for

a monument to his memory. speech of the Hon. H. J. Reynolds, the Vice-Chancellor of the Calcutta University, on the occasion of the Convocation

THE MAHABHARATA IN ENGLISH.-Baboo Protab Chandra of the University, March 10, 1883.

Roy intends publishing an English translation of the MahaTAE MACKENZIE COLLECTION OF ORIENTAL MANUSCRIPTS.

bharata in parts monthly. The edition is to consist of 1250 -Lieut.-Col. Collin Mackenzie, C.B., who was appointed

copies, out of which 250 will be for sale at 65 rupees per copy. Surveyor-General of Madras, after he had been employed HINDU MYTHOLOGY.-The Rev. W. J. Wilkins, of the from 1796 to 1806 in investigating the geography of the London Missionary Society, has published with Messrs. Deecan, and mapping the country, was commissioned by Thacker, Spink & Co, of Calcutta, Thacker & Co., London, a Francis, fifth Earl of Merchistoun, to search for Hindu “Hindu Mythology, Vedic and Puranic," to provide for a want, Manuscripts on Mathematics, and Logarithms in particular, which, he states in his preface, he discovered when he arrived which the Earl intended to use in a life of his ancestor, John in India. He found no reliable and portable work on Hindu Napier-the inventor of English Logarithms. While Colonel Mythology, although the matter which he has brought toMackenzie was engaged in this work, he conceived an gether in a reasonable sized volume might have been met idea that most valuable materials in the way of manuscripts with by consulting large and expensive works. He says he might be collected in the peninsula, on which to found a has honestly striven to keep his mind free from prejudice History of India. For thirty-eight years he was enabled to and theological bias, and to let the sacred books speak for work out this idea, and the result was that his collection themselves, without any commentary. The engravings illusbecame the most valuable collection of Indian historical trating the mythology are faithful reproductions of the documents ever made by any one individual in Europe or in designs of Hindu artists. The work is accompanied by a • Professor Jolly of Würtzburg.

full index.

66

OLD CALCUTTA.-Under the title of Echoes from Old Cal- New York, at 5 cents per number. The editor, Wong Ching cutta," by E. H. Busteed, Messrs. Thacker, Spink & Co., Foo, dictates the matter to a Chinese scribe, which is afterCalcutta, and Thacker & Co., London, have published a wards photographed and printed by lithography on yellow volume which carries us back to the days of Warren Hastings, paper. Mr. Wong Ching Foo promises an English version Francis and Impey. Some portion of the work has appeared of the celebrated Chinese historical novel, “ The Fan Yong" before in the shape of articles contributed to the Calcutta (or Royal Slave), written by Kong Wung over 2000 years ago. English man, but the latter portion of the book is published for the first time, viz.-Extracts from letters from Warren

JAPAN.--Messrs. D. Lothrop & Co., of Boston, have just Hastings to his wife, and the chapter on Madame Grand, issued “Leading Men of Japan,” by Mr. Charles Lanman, of an incident in the Calcutta life of Sir Philip Francis, not

Washington, author of "The Japanese in America." This much to his credit. Madame Grand was afterwards married

work is divided into two parts, the first containing biographito Talleyrand.

cal sketches of the Emperor, his father, and fifty-seven leadINDIA AND ITS SOCIAL CONDITION.-The East India

ing men who have identified themselves with the new national Association have issued an extra number of their Journal for

movement under the present Emperor. The second part January, 1883, on the “Condition of India," being a corre

gives a brief history of the Empire of Japan, an account of spondence with the Secretary of State for India, by Dadabhai

the Islands of Okinawa (Loo Choo), and Ogasawara (The Naoroji, Esq. In this correspondence Mr. Dadabhai Naoroji

Bonins), and an interesting account of Corea. A “foreign points out that under the present system of government the

bibliography of the Empire” is appended. resources of India are being sapped out of her, a new edition THE ELECTRICAL REVIEW.-The Review of the Telegraph of the fable of Killing the goose that lays the golden eggs.” and the Telephone has changed its name to the “ Electrical He says that no country can stand such a process as that Review," and is now published weekly instead of semi, India is undergoing for any length of time without collapsing ; monthly as formerly. It is somewhat enlarged in size and and suggests a modified elementary form of constitutional is still edited by Mr. Geo. Worthington. government as an antidote to the process. The paper is well

THE HISTORY OF JEWĀD.-Messrs. Wilson and McCormick, worthy of thoughtful reading.

of Glasgow, announce their intention to publish, by subINDIAN PRODUCTS.-Some idea of the productive capacity scription, a new work by the author of " Ottoman Poems," of India may be formed by consulting Messrs. Thacker & Co.'s -** The History of Jewād, a Turkish Romance by 'Ali “ Indian Tea, Indigo, Silk, and Coffee Concerns, with their *Aziz Efendi of Crete, translated into English by E. J. W. Capital, Directors, Proprietors, Agents, Managers, Assistants," Gibb, M.R.A.S., author of Ottoman Poems,' etc.' The etc., etc., and last, though not least, their factory marks. volume is a romance dealing with the adventures of a young We think it a pity that the compilers did not include other magician named Jewäd, who wanders through various industries while compiling such a useful reference book, viz. countries seeking to do good. The author, 'Ali `Aziz Efendi tobacco, opium, cotton, cinchona, etc., etc.

of Crete, who died near the close of last century, was learned AGRICULTURE IN INDIA.—The population of India is in Eastern philosophy, and has put into his work several steadily increasing, whilst through untrained cultivators who curious details concerning magic ceremonies and Oriental follow the practice of their forefathers and have no know- spiritualism. As is the case in so many Eastern works of ledge of the chemical qualities of soils, the fertility of the fiction, there are incidental to this romance many secondary country is steadily decreasing. In view of these facts Lieut. tales, which are not less interesting than the leading story Fred. Pogson (Her Majesty's Bengal Army) has compiled a itself. The manners and customs described, or alluded to, “ Manual of Agriculture for India," Messrs. Thacker, Spink are those of the author's own time, and they serve to show & Co., Calcutta, and Thacker & Co., London, for the scientific the esteem in which the Occult Sciences and their protessors instruction of zemindars and ryots, who, as the author says, used to be held in the Levant, as also to give a glimpse into are now called upon “to make two blades of grass grow a section of life in the Ottoman capital long before the introwhere only one grew before.” Lieut. Pogson bas mastered duction of the modern reforms, and while Constantinople was the subject he writes upon, and we recommend the English still a thoroughly Oriental city. So far as the publishers are edition of his work, which is the one before us, to tropical aware, the work has never till now been translated into any agriculturists in all parts of the world. It is proposed to European language. The impression will be limited to 300 print the Manual in Hindee, Urdu, and Punjabee for the copies, and the right reserved to raise the price, 7s., now fixed benefit of the native agriculturist, who must be instructed in should it be found necessary. how to increase food production, as the English Government

PERSIAN WIT AND HUMOUR.-Mr. C. E. Wilson, the has abolished the primitive way of equalizing the food and

Assistant Librarian of the Royal Academy of Arts, has pubthe mouths to eat it by prohibiting female infanticide. The

lished (Chatto and Windus) a translation of the Sixth Book dissemination amongst the rural population of India of the

of the Baháristán of • Abdu'r-Rahmáni 'bnu Ahmad Jami, a sound chemical agricultural knowledge contained in this

learned Doctor of Muhammadan law and divinity, who was manual would tend to lessen the recurrence of the fearful famines which occur periodically in the various districts of

born A.D. 1414 at Jam, a town in the government of Herat.

The book is curious as a specimen of Eastern wit, which is India, and which are Nature's means of getting rid of the

of such a dry character that it would be scarcely considered surplus mouths she is unable to feed.

wit at all amongst the western nations. KASHGARIA.-Major Walter E. Gowan has made a trans- The PARTHENON.-Mr. James Fergusson, C.I.E., D.C.L., lation of Col. A. N. Kuropatkin's Kashgaria, the province etc., etc., the author of so many valuable works on Archiof Eastern or Chinese Turkestan which has recently been

tecture and Archäology, has published with Mr. Murray, delivered back to the Chinese Government by the Russians, Albemarle Street, Piccadilly, “The Parthenon, an Essay who had occupied it during the troubles in China. The book on the mode by which Light was introduced into Greek and makes its appearance a little late, but it will always be useful Roman Temples.” Mr. Fergusson comes to the conclusion as a historical contribution on one of the most important that, as a rule, all Grecian Doric peristylar temples were divisions of Central Asia. Messrs. Thacker, Spink & Co., of lighted by opaions or clerestories; that Ionic temples, except Calcutta, and W. Thacker & Co., London, publish the volume. of the largest class, were lighted by windows such as were

A CATALOGUE OF THE CHINESE TRANSLATION OF THE used when glass was not available ; that Corinthian temples BUDDHIST TRIPITAKA.-Pandit Bunjiu Nanjio. Priest of were generally lighted by hypäthra, or pseudo-hypæthra ; the Temple, Eastern Hongwanzi, Japan, and member of the

that no temple in the ancient world, with the solitary excepRoyal Asiatic Society, London, has compiled a catalogue of

tion of the Pantheon at Rome, was lighted by a horizontal, the Sacred Canon of the Buddhists in China and Japan, by as contradistinguished from a vertical opening. Architects order of the Secretary of State for India. This work, which and Archäologists owe their thanks to Mr. Fergusson for his is a 4to. of 266 pages, is printed by the Clarendon Press at

efforts to elucidate a moot point in the history, as he says, Oxford. This important collation of the sacred books of the of the most perfect style of architecture with which the Buddhists contains the titles of 1662 different works, 342 of

world has hitherto been adorned." them being however miscellaneous ones. The ompiler gives ENGLISH CLASSICS.-In continuation of the series mena long and interesting introduction to his work, in which he tioned in our last issue, Messrs. Nimmo & Bain have issued reviews the thirteen catalogues of the Chinese Tripitaka Sterne's Tristram Shandy in two vols., with eight etchings which are at present in existence, the oldest one dating back by Damman ; Reeve's Old English Baron and Walpole's Castle to A.D. 502-557. The Chinese types used in the catalogue of Otranto in one volume, with two portraits and four etchings. were cast at the Clarendon Press from matrices procured These superior editions will before long become scarce, as from China on the recommendation of Professor Legge. only one thousand copies are printed of each.

THE CHINESE AMERICAN. – A curious periodical has THE DEVELOPMENT OF ENGLISH.-Messrs. S. O. Griggs & reached as under the above title, printed in Chinese and Co., of Chicago, have added another to the list of useful and English, and published by the Enterprise Publishing Company, educating books they publish, by the issue of Professor A. H.

66

[ocr errors]

Welsh's Development of English Literature and Language, in two volumes of 1100 pages. Professor Welsh has aimed in this work to give the best specimens of each epoch in English literature, and so woven them together as to form a history of English literature and language, as shown by the writings of the authors themselves. Various professors and scholars have examined Prof. Welsh's work, and highly commend it.

OLD LOVE LETTERS.—Messrs. J. R. Osgood & Co., of Boston, have published an elegant little volume containing a collection of old love letters, written by eminent persons renowned in English literature and history; it is edited by Mrs. Abby Sage Richardson, who has made the selection of the letters. Curiously enough, the title is the same as a comedy by Mr. Bronson Howard, to whom the editor apologizes for the use of his title. The binding of this little volume is appropriate to the contents, and bears upon it Eros as a seal to the outline of a closed letter.

THE BYSTANDER.-Prof. Goldwin Smith has revived the “ Bystander" as a quarterly review, the first number of which appeared in Toronto (Messrs. Hunter, Rose & Co.), January this year. This first number of the new series teems with items of interest relating to Canada, the “Great North West," the United States, England and Europe, besides articles on current thought and opinion.

The Two Sister REPUBLICS.-Mr. Charles Gayarre has published a work on Aubert Dubayet, who was born in New Orleans in 1759, and whose life was interwoven with the history of the republics of France and the United States. Although this work is strictly historical, Mr. Gayarre has put it into the form of a romance. Etienne Bernard Alexandre Viel, born Louisiana, 1736, and Joseph La Raual, who was a priest and afterwards a member of the National Convention, figure in the narrative. The work is published by Messrs. J. R. Osgood and Co., of Boston, Mass.

BIBLIOTHECA QUAKERISTICA.—Mr. Joseph Smith, who has already made two valuable contributions to the literature of bibliography, viz. “ A Catalogue of Friends' Books," and “Bibliotheca Anti-Quakeriana," has commenced publishing in parts a “ Bibliotheca Quakeristica," a bibliography of miscellaneous literature relating to the Friends (Quakers). This is a catalogue of works chiefly written by persons not members of the Society of Friends, and also those of authors in some way connected with the Society. Mr. Smith has been elected an honorary member of the Friends' Historical Association of Philadelphia, in recognition of his labours in Quaker bibliography.

BIBLIOTHECA AMERICANA.-Messrs. Robert Clarke & Co., of Cincinnati, have issued a Bibliotheca Americana for 1883; it contains 266 pages, besides a partial index of viii. pages and a 42-paged catalogue of their own publications, amongst which are many valuable works on American history and biography, and is noticeable for the richness of its references to Bibliography, British America, Genealogy, Indians, New England, and Slavery and the Negro.

THE VIOLIN, -A valuable addition to the historical literature of musical instruments has been made by the late Mr. Carl Engel, who did not live to see the last revision of it. The Violin family are all represented in this volume, the Roka, the Urheen, the Rokin, the Sarinda, the Thro, the Crwth, the Crowd, the Rotte, the Chorotta, the Rebec, the Geige, the Fiddle, the Vielle, and the Viol. The volume is entitled :* Researches into the Early History of the Violin Family," and is published by Messrs. Novello, Ewer & Co.

POEMS OF THE Household. Under this title Mrs. Margaret E. Stanger has issued a collection of her pieces (Messrs. J. R. Osgood & Co., Boston). Many will recognize amongst them old friends that they have met in various periodicals; but we think not a few of them deserve preserving in the form we now see them, which does credit to the taste of the publishers.

Puck.-It was at one time thought that a comic journal could not be successfully conducted in America, but Messrs. Keppler and Schwarzmann, of New York, seem to bave satisfactorily solved the problem, as “ Puck" is now in its thirteenth volume. It is a weekly comic paper, illustrated by coloured cartoons on current topics and events. In the number before us, April 4th, Communism is represented as a caterpillar feeding on a grape vine, which represents the orderly state of society. Some of the cartoons, however, are connected with the politics of the United States, and would not be understood in Europe, where those politics are very little studied.

BIBLE LITERATURE. Home Life in the Bible. This is the title of a profusely illustrated book by Harriet Lee Palmer, edited by John Williamson Palmer, published by

Messrs. J. R. Osgood & Co., of Boston. Miss Palmer has carefully explored the Old and New Testaments for everything relating to domestic and home life, and has produced a book suitable for Sunday reading. The work is divided into sixteen chapters, comprising habitations and bomes, furniture and utensils, marriage, widowhood and divorce, children, their training, etc., the higher education, employments and servants, larder, kitchen and table, dress and ornaments, the toilet and the bath, domestic and public worship, music sacred and secular, alms and hospitalities, seedtime and harvest, flocks and herds, sickness and death, and burial and mourning.

BIBLE NARRATIVE AND JEWISH AND CHRISTIAN HISTORY is the title of a three-volume illustrated book by the same publishers, which is literally what its title states it is,—the Bible reproduced in an abridged form, without the divisions into verses, as in the Bible. The work is intended for the young, and of course is without the passages which would not be considered edifying to the youthful mind.

The Gospel IN THE STARS. - The Rev. Joseph A. Seiss, D.D., has published a volume of Seventeen Lectures, in which he connects the Gospel Narrative with the constellations and primeval astronomy; he argues that the arrangement of the constellations comes from a divine or prophetical source, and combats the theories of the sceptics, who trace the origin of the Christian religion to the stars. The work is published by Messrs. E. Claxton & Co., of Philadelphia.

The FORMULARY.—This is the title of a publication published by Mr. B. Fenner, Westfield, New York, of formulary celebrity. It contains all the new recipes useful to pharmaceutical chemists and perfumers. April of this year is No. 1 of a new series, which is to be a monthly journal of practical pharmacy devoted to the every-day wants and uses of American druggists. It contains 160 pages and is 2 dols. per annum. If the same number of pages are given every month, it will, at this price, be the cheapest periodical of the kind ever published.

HELPS FOR READERS.—Mr. F. Leypoldt, of New York, has added to his useful helps to readers by issuing “ Books for the Young," a guide for Parents and Children, compiled by C. M. Hewins, Librarian of Hartford Library Association. This is a catalogue of the best books for the young, with chapters on "How to teach the Right Use of Books," • English and American History for Children,” and a “Symposium on Books for Children."-" Libraries and Readers,” by W. E. Foster, the Librarian of the Providence Public Library, is another little volume which contains useful advice to the users of libraries, instructing them how to regulate their reading so that it may not be wild and aimless.-" Libraries and Schools "contains papers selected by S. S. Green, Librarian of the Free Public Library, Worcester, Mass. These papers are by himself, Charles Francis Adams, junior, Robert C. Metcalf, and W. E. Foster, most of them culled from larger publications and thus brought together in an accessible forin just adapted to the wants of the student reader. These useful little manuals are worthy companions to the “ Books for all Time," and " Reading Diary of Modern Fiction," already published by Mr. Leypoldt, who is an indefatigable caterer for the wants of the lovers of books.

BOOKS AND How to Use Them. - The bibliophile is never tired of books about books, and he will gladly welcome an addition to his stock of that literature in the little volume of Mr. John C. Van Dyke, published by Messrs. Fords, Howard and Hulbert, New York, entitled - Books and How to Use them. Practical Hints for Readers and Students." Mr. Van Dyke strikes out a new path for himself, and does not follow any beaten track in this little book ; he even counsels the occasional reading of badly written, erroneous, and illdigested books for practice in analyzing error. The chapters are headed “ Books and Wisdom," " How to Read," " When and where to Read," “What to Read," Bibliography." “The Public Library, and How to Use it," with an Appendix of Bibliographical Reference Books.

NANTUCKET SCRAPS.-Under this title Mrs. Jane G. Austin has published with Messrs. Jas. R. Osgood & Co., a volume of sketches of the site of the supposed Scandinavian settlement in America before the discovery by Columbus and celebrated in poesy by Longfellow's “ Skeleton in Armour." The “Scraps," seventeen in number, twelve being dedicated to Nantucket in season, and five to it out of season.

THE CRITIC.—Last January this excellent literary journal commenced publishing as a Weekly. Starting in January, 1881, as a Fortnightly Review of Literature, Fine Arts, Science, etc., it has steadily worked its way into the fore.

[ocr errors]
« AnteriorContinuar »