A Short History of Parliament

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Harper, 1887 - 345 páginas
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Página 99 - May it please your Majesty, I have neither eyes to see, nor tongue to speak in this place but as the House is pleased to direct me, whose servant I am here; and humbly beg your Majesty's pardon, that I cannot give any other answer than this to what your Majesty is pleased to demand of me.
Página 187 - The atrocious crime of being a young man, which the honourable gentleman has, with such spirit and decency, charged upon me, I shall neither attempt to palliate nor deny; but content myself with wishing that I may be one of those whose follies may cease with their youth, and not of that number who are ignorant in spite of experience.
Página 238 - I impeach him in the name of the Commons of Great Britain, in Parliament assembled, whose parliamentary trust he has betrayed. ' I impeach him in the name of all the Commons of Great Britain, whose national character he has dishonored.
Página 187 - I may be one of those whose follies may cease with their youth, and not of that number who are ignorant in spite of experience. " Whether youth can be imputed to any man as a reproach, I will not, Sir, assume the province of determining ; but surely age may become justly contemptible, if the opportunities which it brings have passed away without improvement, and vice appears to prevail when the passions have subsided.
Página 99 - since I see all the birds are flown, I do expect from you that you shall send them unto me as soon as they return hither. But I assure you, on the word of a King, I never did intend any force, but shall proceed against them in a legal and fair way, for I never meant any other.
Página 133 - And yet this revolution, of all revolutions the least violent, has been, of all revolutions, the most beneficent. It finally decided the great question whether the popular element which had, ever since the age of Fitzwalter and De Montfort, been found in the English polity, should be destroyed by the monarchical element, or should be suffered to develop itself freely, and to become dominant.
Página 226 - This resistance to your arbitrary system of taxation might have been foreseen : it was obvious from the nature of things, and of mankind ; and above all, from the whiggish spirit flourishing in that country. The spirit which now resists your taxation in America, is the same which formerly opposed loans, benevolences, and ship-money in...

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