Footsteps of Our Forefathers: What They Suffered and what They Sought. Describing Localities, and Portraying Personages and Events Conspicuous in the Struggles for Religious Liberty

Portada
Gould and Lincoln, 1854 - 352 páginas

Dentro del libro

Comentarios de la gente - Escribir un comentario

No encontramos ningún comentario en los lugares habituales.

Otras ediciones - Ver todas

Términos y frases comunes

Pasajes populares

Página 70 - I charge you before God and His blessed angels that you follow me no further than you have seen me follow the Lord Jesus Christ. " If God reveal anything to you by any other instrument of His, be as ready to receive it as ever you were to receive any truth by my ministry ; for I am verily persuaded the Lord has more truth yet to break forth out of His holy Word.
Página 217 - Lord, though I am a miserable and wretched creature, I am in Covenant with Thee through grace. And I may, I will, come to Thee, for Thy people. Thou hast made me, though very unworthy, a mean instrument to do them some good, and Thee service...
Página 117 - ... the eyes of all men were fixed upon him, as their patrite pater, and the pilot that must steer the vessel through the tempests and rocks which threatened it. And I am persuaded, his power and interest, at that time, was greater to do, good or hurt, than any man's in the kingdom, or than any man of his rank hath had in any time : for his reputation of honesty was universal, and his affections seemed so publicly guided, that no corrupt or private ends could bias them.
Página 34 - Thus this brook has conveyed his ashes into Avon, Avon into Severn, Severn into the narrow seas, they into the main ocean; and thus the ashes of Wickliffe are the emblem of his doctrine, which now is dispersed all the world over.
Página 349 - Sandstone," &c. From the third London Edition. With a Memoir of the Author, by Louis AGASSIZ. 12mo, cloth, 1,00. Dr. BUCKLAND, at a meeting of the British Association, said he had never been so much astonished in his life, by the powers of any man, as he had been by the geological descriptions of Mr. Miller. That wonderful man described these objects with a facility which made him ashamed of the comparative meagreness and poverty of his own descriptions in the " Bridgewater Treatise," which had cost...
Página 100 - We charge him with having broken his coronation oath; and we are told that he kept his marriage vow! We accuse him of having given up his people to the merciless inflictions of the most hot-headed and hard-hearted of prelates; and the defense is that he took his little son on his knee, and kissed him!
Página 318 - Poor child ! thought I, what sorrow art thou like to have for thy portion in this world ! Thou must be beaten ; must beg ; suffer hunger, cold, nakedness and a thousand calamities, though I cannot now endure the wind should blow upon thee...
Página 100 - The advocates of Charles, like the advocates of other malefactors against whom overwhelming evidence is produced, generally decline all controversy about the facts, and content themselves with calling testimony to character. He had so many private virtues ! And had James the Second no private virtues?
Página 286 - He made a very ill appearance : he was very big : his hair red, hanging oddly about him : his tongue was too big for his mouth, which made him bedew all that he talked to : and his whole manner was rough and boisterous, and very unfit for a court.
Página 135 - The loss of Colonel Hampden goeth near the heart of every man that loves the good of his king and country, and makes some conceive little content to be at the army now that he is gone. The memory of this deceased colonel is such, that in no age to come but it will more and more be had in honour and esteem ; a man so religious, and of that prudence, judgment, temper, valour, and integrity, that he hath left few his like behind.

Información bibliográfica