Conflicting Communication Interests in America: The Case of National Public Radio

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Greenwood Publishing Group, 1999 - 210 páginas


Public broadcasting has changed dramatically since its founding in 1967. The growing equation of marketplace efficiency with the public interest has, in Tom McCourt's analysis, undermined the value of public goods and services. In addition, political and cultural discourse is increasingly beset by fragmentation. Public radio provides an exemplary site to examine the prospects and problems of contemporary public life.

Beginning with a description of the events that led to the creation of National Public Radio, McCourt discusses the relationship between NPR and its affiliate stations and the ways in which struggles over funding and programming have affected public radio's agenda. He also examines how public radio incorporates the roles of public representatives into its operations and how its methods to determine the needs and interests of the public have changed across the system's history. The social, political, and economic pressures that have impacted the mission and practices of National Public Radio, McCourt asserts, are manifest in all areas of American life. Through extensive historical research, he examines whether American public broadcasters, as represented by NPR, have succeeded or failed to engender an enlightened, participatory democracy.

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This book did not deserve one star. I forced to give it such a high rating due to the problem that rating a book with 0 stars is not possible. It clearly is not worth its price. I will not recommend this book to anyone. I am quite angry that I wasted my money on this rubbish.

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Contenido

Introduction
1
The Development of National Public Radio
21
The Localized Public The Federalist Conundrum
71
The Surrogate Public Boards Funders and Producers
111
The Reified Public From Ascertainment to Ratings
145
Epilogue
179
Selected Bibliography
191
Index
201
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Página 35 - ... what we recommend is freedom. We seek freedom from the constraints, however necessary in their context, of commercial television. We seek for educational television freedom from the pressures of inadequate funds. We seek for the artist, the technician, the journalist, the scholar, and the public servant freedom to create, freedom to innovate, freedom to be heard in this most far-reaching medium. We seek for the citizen freedom to view, to see programs that the present system, by its incompleteness,...
Página 2 - Foundation's two agencies — the National Endowment for the Arts and the National Endowment for the Humanities — the...
Página 77 - We stand to gain substantially from an increase in the relative power of the local stations. They are generally less liberal, and more concerned with education than with controversial national affairs. Further, a decentralized system would have far less influence and be far less attractive to social activists.
Página 35 - If we were to sum up our proposal with all the brevity at our command, we would say that what we recommend is freedom. We seek freedom from the constraints, however necessary in their context, of commercial television. We seek for educational television freedom from the pressures of inadequate funds. We seek for the artist, the technician, the journalist, the scholar, and the public servant freedom to...
Página 18 - Mike Davis, City of Quartz: Excavating the Future in Los Angeles (New York: Vintage Books, 1992), 36-40. On Lubin, see Kevin Starr, Endangered Dreams: The Great Depression in California (New York: Oxford University Press, 1996), 231-32. On Burke, see articles in "J. Frank Burke" envelope, Los Angeles Examiner Files, HC.
Página 111 - The programs will enable the individual to better understand himself, his government, his institutions and his natural and social environment so he can intelligently participate in effecting the process of change. The total service should be trustworthy, enhance intellectual development, expand knowledge, deepen aural esthetic enjoyment, increase the pleasure of living in a pluralistic society and result in a service to listeners which makes them more responsive, informed human beings and intelligent...
Página 34 - It should provide a voice for groups in the community that may otherwise be unheard.
Página 139 - The Analysis of Goals in Complex Organizations," American Sociological Review, 26 (December, 1961), pp.
Página 187 - It is almost everywhere held to be sacred or "holy," possibly because it transgresses or dissolves the norms that govern structured and institutionalized relationships and is accompanied by experiences of unprecedented potency.
Página 37 - States) who are eminent in such fields as education, cultural and civic affairs, or the arts, including radio and television; (B) shall be selected so as to provide as nearly as practicable a broad representation of various regions of the country, various professions and occupations, and various kinds of talent and experience appropriate to the functions and responsibilities of the Corporation.

Acerca del autor (1999)

TOM McCOURT is Assistant Professor of Communications at the University of Illinois at Springfield./e His research interests include media history, communication technology, music, and cultural studies, with particular focus on the historical relationship of technology and the public sphere.

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