Imágenes de páginas
PDF
EPUB
[blocks in formation]

an

bounte 57 1.5; Richardson. bowbearer 216 1. 39; Coles ' under-officer in a forest.' breddes 134 l. 17; bredes 133 l. 1— 3, 16, 28, 134 l. 2, 3, 16—18, 28; Peacock Church Furn. 204, 208, 209.

bredern 86 n. 3 quinquies; bredren

157 1. 9; Machyn's Diary 172 'bredurne'; Stratmann 78 a. breve 69 1. 27; Northumb. Household Book 115 'breve' is a v.; cf. brevementes' ibid. 115, 160 seq., 180 seq. brevely 180 1. 6.

breviat 225 1. 21; Barclay's Egloges cited in Wood-Bliss A. O. I 209 'by beastly surfeit the life is breviate.'

brigs 2271. 15; Nicolas Privy purse

H. VIII 23 iij doubelettes of bruges satin'; ibid. 222 'xj yerdes of Bruges satin'; Peacock Church Furniture 94 'one white vestment of bridges satten [Footnote 'A rich kind of satin, manufactured at Bruges. it is of very common occurrence in old inventories, e.g. "a pillow and two cushions covered with ray sattin from Burges, stuffed with feathers, ol. 13s. 4d." Inventory of the goods of Thomas Keble A. D. 1500, in Nichols, Illustr. of Manners and Expenses, 1797, p. 239-'] ripte in peces and a clothe made thereof to hange before o pulpitt'; ibid. 202 a vestyment of white satten of brigges powthered with flowres with an orfray of blak velvett and greene satten of brigges . . . a vestyment of white satten of brigges with a crosse of violett satten of brigges powtherid with flowres,' ten other exx. on same page; ibid. 221 'a suyt of sattyn of Brydges decon and subdecon and ij copis with garters xiiijs. iiijd.'; ibid. 222 to Leonard Cother a sute of satten Bridges decon and subdecon and two copes with garters xvjs.'; ibid. 232 ij redde vestementes, on of saten of bregez iij auterclothez, on pained with redd and greyne saton of bregez'; Lodge's Illustrations (1838) 1 26 'one black brigs hat, two black satin brigs.' brikmaker 193 1. 8, 13.

...

[merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small]

s.v. bord; Jamieson s. v. burd. bushopric 95 1. 31.

=

by. woorde by woorde 158 1. 8. by during 79 1. 22, 81 1. 36; Fisher's Funeral sermon on H.VII (ed. Hymers 144): 'so many teres, so many callynges for mercy, by all that gracyous tyme, by all the hole lente.'

bysyd 191 1. 28; bysydes 185 1. 3, 190 1. 28, 31.

caas case 92 1. 16; Chaucer Cant. Tales prol. 323 'in termes hadde he caas and domes alle'; 585 'in any caas that mighte fall or happe'; the knight's tale 1382; cf. id. prol. 392 laas = lace; 394 maad made.

[blocks in formation]

cesyth 2 pers. pl. 82 1. 18; Stratmann

s.v. cessen; Richardson s. v. cease. chalece 130 l. 10; chalice 1. 11, 15, 20; chales 1. 19, 23, 131 1. 39; chalesez 182 1. I; chalyse 132 1. 31; Scudamore Notitia Eucharistica 490-6; Peacock Church Furn. often.

chamberer 113 1. 10; Coles 'chamberer, chamber-maid'; Jamieson ; Halliwell; Madden Privy Purse ...of Princess Mary 44; Todd; Richardson.

chapellyn 187 1. 16. chapitoure 109 1. 4. chareys 181 1. 8. chargez 195 1. 19. chasett 135 1. 14.'

cheaneys 131 1. 10; cheaynes 1. 8. cheyned 132 1. 7.

chesible=chasuble 131 1. 27, 132 1.

12, 17; Marriott Vestiar. Christ. ind. s. v. casula; Jewell ed. Ayre, III 177; Cardwell Docum. Ann. I 151 1. 16 chesuble; Todd; FoxeCattley IV 364 chesille; Scudamore Notitia Eucharistica 65-7, 88— 92; Rock Church of our Fathers I 3J5-339. cheveron 135 1. 15; c. wise 1. 14; chevorn wise 133 l. 20. chevisancez 25 1. 9.

chier 72 1. 7; Stratmann 115 a. Christen 105 1. 19.

chyldern 185 1. 25.

clarkis 108 1. 29; clerkez 190 1. 33. clok, of the 75 l. 15, 21. clothez 189 1. 27.

[ocr errors]

clunces clunch 225 1. 10. cnopp 133 1. 4; Stratmann s. vv. cnobbe, cnop. See knopp. colde=could 93 1. 8. colde=cool, collected 111 l. 40b; Jamieson s. v. cald cites Douglas wise and cald.' Wolsey to H. VIII (in Burnet Hist. Ref. pt. 3 I coll. n. 6 p. 9) speaking of Charles V the emperor's own person, which I assure your grace for his age is very wise and understanding his affairs; right cold and temperate in speech.' coler collar 133 l. 29. collace (cullace) 244 1. 17, 19; Todd and Richardson s. v. cullis; Fr. coulis; Coles cullis, the strained juice of boiled meat. comen common 157 1. 6, 196 1. 26; William of Palerne 6. commendacyons 75 1. 25; W. K. Clay Private prayers put forth... during the reign of Elizabeth 58; Bingham XXIII 3§11 f.; Ducange; Coles commendaces, prayers for 'the dead'; Rock Church of our Fathers 11 477; Maskell Monum. Rit. 11 156-176. communycacion 86 1. 29 a. compase 133 l. 18; c. about = round about, all round. compleccyon 111 1. 26 b. comyn common 114 1. 34, 36; Langland Piers the Plowman pass. III 20 'with the kynge and the comyns'; Fisher Seven penit. Ps. f.ee iiii vthe comyn wretchednes of all syners'. concayle conceal 81 1. 13. conforme thayme to rayson 92 1. 14. confyderyes III 1. 28 b.

connynge, in good sense So 1. II, 95 1. 34 (conyng); Tyndal P. S. II 336; Wordsworth Eccl. Biogr. 1 265 I believe that all these three persons are even in power, in cunning and in might'; ibid. 283, 285, 286, 291, 309 etc.; Dyce's Skelton ind. s.vv. conninge, connynge; MS. Harl. 433 cited by Collier Hist. Dram. Poetr. I 34 n. 'habilitie and connynge in the science of musique.' consuetudez 157 1. 22; the sing. in Coles and in Richardson (from Barnes).

conteigned 212 1. 27; cf. Campbell Materials...H. VIII 434 'obteygned'.

contentacion 1971. 7, 213 1. 39, 214

1. 13; Campbell Materials for the hist. of H. VIII 72 f. 'to paye and contente to the said John Dawney the said somme'; ibid. 602 for the contentacioun and payment of the wages of the souldeours.' In a more general sense Hooker E. P. 111 § 3; Wordsworth Eccl. Biogr. 14 471, 655. conteyne, couthe not c. but 83 1. 6. converse in a monastery 105 l. 5, 107 1. 10 and n. 1. coope=cope (2) 132 l. 17.

cope (1) cup 235 l. 42—6, 236 l. 2, 4, 6.

cope (2) a vestment 131 1. 27, 1321. 13; pl. copez 182 1. 5, 183 l. 7; copys 132 1. 13; see ind. to Parker Society books, to Cardwell's Docum. Annals and Synodalia; Marriott Vestiarium Christ. 224; Scudamore Notitia Eucharistica 59-67; Rock Church of our Fathers II 23-52, 84-9; Peacock Church Furniture often. corage encourage 961. 3; Ascham's Scholemaster (1863) 17 'he lacketh

=

teaching, he lacketh coraging';

Todd and Richardson s. v. courage. coridie 134 1. 38; Johnson s. v. corrody; Testam. Vetusta 219; Coles 'corody, corr-, an allowance to any of the king's servants from an abby etc. whereof he is founder.'

corone 7 1. 36; Richardson s. v. coronal.

=

corporall possession 155 1. 38. cosshions cushions; c. cloth a gold 179 1. 20. counterpoynt 133 l. 12, 33, 38, 179 1. 4, 14; counterpoynte 133 l. 14; countrepoynt 134 1. 35; Richardson; Nares; Nicolas Privy Purse ......of Eliz. of York ind.; Coles 'back-stitch or quilt-stitch; also the quilt, carpet etc.'; see below s. v. happings.

course coarse 133 1. 3, 134 1. 18, 29; Gascoigne, Mede, Hammond in Richardson; Palgrave Anc. Kalendars and Inventories II 275 'ij course saphures, two course balaces and x course perles'; Joye in Maitland Essays on the Reformation 8 'I was but a course courtyer, never before hearynge this terme chamber of presence ne knew where it was'; Phillips cited below s. v. happings. couthecould 83 1. 6; Stratmann S. v. cunnen; Chaucer Cant. Tales prol. 236 'wel couthe he synge';

ib. 325-7, 390, 476; Morris Engl. Accidence 183; Lewis Life of Fisher II 281; Spenser The shepheardes calender Nov. 95 'so well she couth the shepherds entertayne.' couenanten 156 1. 10.

[ocr errors]

covent 137 1. 19, 153 l. 34, 157 l. 25, 197 1. 32; covente 157 l. 15, 190 l. 14; cf. Covent Garden 'Coventry'; Monk of Evesham, ed. Arber 19 fin.; Tyndal P. S. II 24; Skelton Colin Clout 849; Stratmann 99a; Promptor.parv.97. covetyse 113 1. 29; Grosart ind. to Donne s. v. covetise; Fairfax Tasso V 48, VI 15; Wordsworth Eccl. Biogr. 1 278 'wo worth false covetise'; Langland Piers the Plowman prol. 58, pass. V 107; Richardson s. v. covet; Promptor. parv. 96.

cowched 130 1.37; Chaucer Knightes tale 1302-3 'his coote armure was of cloth of Tars, | cowched with perles whyte and round and grete'; Promptor. parv. 96' cowCHYN, or leyen thinges togedyr, K. Colloco'.

cowd could 64 1. 25; see couthe; Chaucer Cant. Tales prol. 490 'he cowde in litel thing han suffisaunce'; ib. 94, 95, 110, 130, 382, 383, 467, 474. cowmfetts 46 1. 32, 238 1. 30. cowthecould 1381. 17; Lewis Life

of Fisher 11 280-1; see couthe. cramps 112 1. 23; Stratmann s. v. crampe.

crased 49 1. 5; Coles 'crasie, sick, distempered, weak'; Bradford P. S. II 95, 116; Ridley 366. credence trust, credit 81 1. 35; credense 64 1. 31; credentials 91 1. 18; Andrewes Sermons (1661) 710' He saith, As my Father sent me, so send I you: which is their authorizing, or giving them their credence'; M. A. E. Wood Letters of royal...ladies 1 217; Burnet Hist. Ref. pt. 3 II coll. n. 17 letter 3 pr. by sundry our letters sent and delivered at several times by the hands of our counsellors unto you with credence declared unto you by the same'; Sir W. Temple in Richardson. cremsyn 131 1. 16; crimsen 1. 22; crymsen 133 1. 32; crymsin 131 1.28; crymsyn 1. 18, 132 1. 10. crosstaff 122 1. 18; crosse staff 130 1. 9.

croundall 260 1. 2.

crowne of our Lady 76 1. 8 and n. 1. cruettes 131 1. 3, 31; Bonner's visi

tation articles 1554 n. 6 required two cruets to be found by the parishioners in every church; Peacock's Church Furniture 29, 30, 32, 33 bis, 38, 42, 43, 44, 47, 48 bis, 50, 51, 52, 54, 56, 59, 60, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 69, 71, 72, 75, 77, 86, 92, 93, 136, 137 bis, 141 bis, 144, 161 bis, 162 bis, 243, 246. crystez=Christ's 186 1. 17. crystynyng 185 l. 24. cudde=could 137 l. 16, 18, 138 1. 14; Lewis Life of Fisher 11 2789, 281. curtayse 113 1. 33; Rob. of Brunne Handlyng synne 5862 curteysy; Chaucer Man of lawes tale 166, 179 curteisye; cf. Dyce's Skelton II 321, 325, 337; The nut-brown maid 153; Richardson s. v. court; Stratmann s. vv. curteis, curteisie. customably 77 1. 7; Todd; Richardson.

dafowlyd defouled 109 1. 3; Richardson s. v. defile; Promptor. 116. damasce. pro aqua damasce 108 1. 2; damask water 251 1. 40; Sir T. More in Richardson. damaske 133 1. 33, 134 l. 25; Coles

'fine stuff, first made in Damascus'.

dame. my d. 91 1. 29; (Madame 92 1. 40, 93 l. 3; Madam 95 1. 29, 32). damoyselles 45 1. 28; Wordsworth Eccl. Biogr. 14 538 'my lady regent, with a number of ladies and damoselles, were standing in chariots'; Bacon's Essays, ed. Wright 160.

dealte=given in dole 118 1. 26a. deceasse n. s. 118 1. 7 a; deces 156 1. 38; decesse 118 1. 19 a, 204 1. 9. defendresse 114 1. 32; Stow in Richardson s. v. defend.

decesse verb 118 1. 5a; disceasse 1. 12 a; Wood-Bliss A.,0. II 705 'of your charyte pray for the sowle of James Stanley sometymes bishop of Elye and wardeyn of Manchester, who decessed thys transeytory wourld the xxii of March in the yere of owre Lord God M.D.XV'.

delecates n. s. 72 1. 9; Todd; Rich. ardson; Wright's Bible Wordbook.

denarate 163 1. 13, 17; Coles 'denariata terrae, a fardingdeal or farundel of land, the 4th part of an acre'. Qu.

deners dinners 188 1. 23; Collier Hist. Dram. Poetry I 163 from a MS. in the Cotton collection: 'my lord treasorers lord of mysrule cam to my lord mare and had my lord to dener'; Machyn's Diary often.

derrest 237 1. 24; Campbell Materials for hist. H. VII 1 467; Stratmann s. v. deore. descrieth makes known, discovers 124.1. 37b.

determinacion of an accompt 181 1. 13; determinacyon 1. 14; determynacion 1. 12.

determined = put an end to 153 1. 28. dettriment (in college) 256 1. 31; Phillips 'Detriment. At LincolnsInn it is a duty of Is. 6d. paid each term by every member of the society to the house, for defraying its charges and repairing losses.'

devocyon, fastes of 76 1. 24. deynties 72.1. 8; Morris and Skeat Specimens II gloss. s. v. deynté; Promptor. 117a; Richardson s. v. daint. diaper 250 1. 39; Richardson; Nicolas Privy Purse. . of Elizabeth of York 131, 139; Peacock Church Furniture 193, 204, 208–9; Testam. Vet. 329 ter, 330. diffende or offende 92 1. 15. discipylles scholars of a college 139

[ocr errors]

1. 33. disclose 239 1. 39. discretion, age of 6 n. 3. disguising 73 1. 1, 7 and n. 1; Campbell Materials for hist. of H. VII I 337; Leland's Collectar. IV 234; Green's Princesses IV 65, V 128, 137; Wordsworth Eccl. Biogr. 1 518 n., 549; Collier's Hist. Dram. Poetry I xvii, xviii, 16, 17, 31 n., 44-6, 48, 54, 66-8, 73, 75-6, 78, 90, 163 n.

dishonest v. a. 114 1. 15; Richard

son.

dispense n. s. 81. 7; Richardson s. vv. dispend, dispense; Jamieson s. v. dispence.

disports 73 1. 17; Chaucer Cant.

Tales prol. 137, 775; Wordsworth Eccl. Biogr. 14 626 ter; Sanderson, ed. Jacobson II 263; Richardson.

displeasure = trouble, pains 114 1. 36.

dispossesse 154 1. 10; Richardson. disseyved 240 1.40; Richardson s. v. deceive.

distayne 114 l. 15; Richardson s. v. distain; Stratmann 128a.

diverse = divers 197 1. 40, 203

1. I.

doo 7 1. 39' hath doo the seid Margarete to be maried to his said sonne'.

=

doon done 186 1. 20; Chaucer Man of lawes tale 171 'thise marchantz han doon fraught her shippes newe'; ib. 174, 433. doppes 134 1. 10; doppis 133 l. 27. dredde part. III 1. 30b; Maskell Monum. Rit. II 281dred'; Monk of Evesham, ed. Arber 29; Stratmann s. v. dræden. dressynge 77 1. 8.

drygez 189 1. 3; see dyryges. durre door 861.11; Henry the Min

strel Wallace I 238 'in at the dur he went with this gud wiff'; Stratmann s. v. dure.

duties = rights, debts justly due to me 92 1. 5, 35. dydrygurders hurdygurdies 187 1.

39.

dyrect partic. 55 l. 2.

dyryges 75 1. 25; dyrygges 84 1. 26; Richardson s.v. dirge; ind. Parker Soc. s. v. dirige; Roy, ed. Arber 140; Rock Church of our Fathers II 502-3; Promptorium 121 b 'DYRYGE, offyce for dede men (dyrge, P.)'; Maskell Monum. Rit. II I10-155. dysease toil, discomfort 46 1. 5, 76 1. 6; Trench Select Glossary; Todd; Richardson; Chaucer Man of lawes tale 616.

easyness to be spoken unto 1131. 32. eche 131 1.37; Chaucer Cant. Tales prol. 39; Rob. Glouc. Will. the Conqueror 109; Stratmann 13a S. v. ahwilc; Mätzner Sprachproben II 28; Richardson s. v. each.

[merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small]

elemesse 118 1. 20 a, 33a, 12 b; elemose 118 1. 9a, 24 a, 15 b; Mätzner Sprachproben 11 56—7; Stratmann s. v. elmesse.

elles where 203 1. 25; Stratmann S. v. elles; Chaucer prol. 375, Man of Lawes Tale 644; Gower in Morris and Skeat Specimens n. 20 57; Richardson s. v. else. emblason 124 l. 38 b.

ems (misreadeins), sets of the letter M (i.e. Mary) 133 1. 30; Peacock Church Furniture 198 'a dosen siluer spones hauynge this lettre m in the ende of the stele of them.. ij chaplettes for ij chambrlaynes of blew velvett powderyd with sterres of gold with letters M and lilies of perle... a great masse booke with ij claspis of siluer parcell gilte, whereof the higher had a crowned M and the other hath a crownyd Jhesus. . one cowcher with ij claspis of siluer and gilte whereof the higher is gravyn with Jhesus and the other is gravyn with this lettre M'; ibid. 203 'an altar cloth of tawny damask with egles standyng on bookes with this lettre M crowned. . . an altar cloth of blew damaske with this lettre M crowned'; ibid. 207. enameled 130 l. 4, 131 1. 35; enamyled 130 1. 7, 9, 22—3, 33, 131 1. 34, 133 1. 15, 134 1. 24; Richardson; Fairfax Tasso 1 35. enboced embossed 130 1. 32, 36; Richardson s. v. emboss; Skelton Garlande of Laurell 467 ‘of birral enbosid wer the pyllers rownde'. enbroderd 131 1. 16, 17, 19; enbrodered 132 1. 12; enbrodred 131 1. 21; Skelton Garlande of Laurell 906-9 'with margerain ientyll, the floure of goodlyhedes enbrowdred the mantilis of your maydenhede'; ib. 794; Richardson s. v. embroider. encombraunce 112 1. 15. encombred 92 1. 40; encombyr 64

1. 26; Stratmann s. v. encombren; Chaucer Prol. 508 and leet his scheep encombred in the myre'.

encompanyed 72 1. 4.

endevoyring you 230 1. 7; Andrewes Sermons (1661) 255 fin. 'only let us pray and endeavour our selves, that we receive it not in vain'; Jacobson's Sanderson III 259; Trench Select Glossary; W. A. Wright ind. to Bacon's Advancement; Skelton Garlande of Laurell 756' and will not endeuour hymselfe

to purchase the favour of ladys with wordis electe'; ibid. 935-9 'so I, iwus, endeuoure me yowr name to se it be enrolde, | writtin with golde'; Green's Princesses v 116; Lewis Life of Fisher II 331; Fisher Seven penit. Ps. f. ee ii vo; Burnet Hist. Ref. pt. III coll. n. 23 p. 60 ad fin.; ib. III coll. n. 2 p. 139 pr.; ibid. coll. add. n. 9 p. 362; pt. 3 II coll. n. 14 pr.; Roy, ed. Arber 25; Wordsworth Eccl. Biogr. 14 414, 623, 653. enheritable 7 1. 35; R. Morris Early Engl. allit. Poems II 240 enherite'; Richardson s. v. enheritance.

enhaunged 72 1. 1.

[ocr errors]

enproperde 197 1. 33; cf. Gower in Richardson s. v. appropre; above approperde.

ensyrvid 72 1. 7.

enterchaungeable 157 1. 13; Andrewes Sermons (1661) 373 (the first of the pages with this number) ad fin. but now, Meum is made vestrum; and vestrum,meum. his, ours; and ours his, enterchangeably'; Richardson s. v. enterchange.

enterely 91 1. 13; entierlye 118 1. II b.

entysement 112 1. 11; Richardson S. V. entice.

eny 129 1. 25, 154 l. 12, 38, 156 1.

32, 230 1. 13; Chaucer Prol. 198; Robert of Glouc. Will. the Conqueror 124 in eny wise'; Stratmann s. v. ani; Mätzner Sprachproben 11 29-30; Roy, ed. Arber 81 bis, 103 bis, etc.

ephitaff 200 1. 33; Skelton, ed. Dyce, I 168 seq. epithaphe; Gower in Richardson. erect partic. 72 1. 3. eschewe 114 1. 14; eschewynge 76 1. 17; Wordsworth Eccl. Biogr. 14 345 'so that they had absented them and eschewed from all occasions of covetousnesse... to flee and to eschewe the way that they have chosen'; Hawes Passetyme of Pleasure c. 33 13 to eschew an inconvenience'; Richardson; Wright's Bible Wordbook; Stratmann s. v. scheowen 425 b. establisch 156 1. 16.

estate. clothes of e. 179 1. 19; see astate; Skelton Bouge of Courte 50 'lady of estate'; id. Phyllyp Sparowe 1289.

etynge day )( fasting day 75 1. 22. evenly=fairly, impartially 79 1. 24;

Bacon in Johnson; Richardson.

« AnteriorContinuar »