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even songs of the day and of our Lady 75 1. 26; Maskell Monum. Ritual. II lii-lvii, 60-4. ever. ower ever duety 82 1. 9. exampler of honoure 114 l. 34; Todd; Richardson s. v. example. exhibit partic. 82 l. 17. exibiscion 256 1. 40-42; exibiscione 1. 39; Latimer, Sermon on the Ploughers 'in tymes paste when any ryche man dyed in London, they were wont to healp the pore scholers of the vniuersitye wyth exhibition'; FoxeCattley IV 617-8, V 5. expensez 198 1. 13. extinct v. 153 1. 28, 259 1. 6; Injunctions of Edw. vi 1547 n. 28 they shall take away, utterly extinct and destroy all shrines'; Wordsworth Eccl. Biogr. 14 250 'they thinking thereby utterly to extinct and abolish both the name and doctrine of Wickliffe for ever'; Todd; Richardson. eylode, a custom of Kent 162 1. 17. eyther 131 1. 31.

fader 153 1. 23; ffader 1. 20, 32, 38; Stratmann s. v. fæder.

fayne 137 1. 10; Richardson s. v. fain; Promptorium 146; Bacon's Essayes, ed. Wright, 80 'he was faine to doe all things himselfe'; Stratmann 155 b.

fayttes feats 45 l. 37; Skelton, ed. Dyce II 79 ver. 398 'fortunate in his faytes.'

ferde afraid 81 1. 37; Wiat Sat. I 55 'was never mouse so ferde'; Morris and Skeat Specimens II 95 ver. 183 'sa was he for thir wormes ferde'; Stratmann s. v. færen; Richardson s. v. fear; Foxe-Cattley-gloss. s. v. feared. ferder 64 1. 27; ferdyr 1. 31; Stratmann s. v. feor; Douglas in Jamieson; ferrest 118 1. 15a. fether bedd 133 l. 3, 134 l. 26. fire ball of tynne 211 1. 29. fodder 255 1. 3, 8 (fowder), 21, 32, 33; Campbell's Materials for hist. H. VIII 345 fothers of lead'; Lodge's Illustrations (1838) I 20, 29; Stratmann 187 a; Richardson s. v. fother; Jamieson s. v. fudder; Alysaunder 1809, 6467.

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foot for a crosse to rest in 122 l. 23; fote gilte for a crucifix 130 l. 5; Peacock Church Furniture 208 'a fote of wood gilte for the crosse to stand vppon'; ibid. 67.

for Lat. prae 76 1. 19 as for fastynge, for aege and feebleness albeit she were not bounde'; Stratmann; for to come 26 bis, 29, 31, 45 l. 22, 46 1. 6; Wright Bible Wordbook; John of Trevisa in Morris and Skeat Specimens II 241 166 'compelled for to leue here oune longage.'

foren foreign )( domestic 190 l. 39; Northumb. household book 39 ' clerk of the foren expensis'; ibid. 365, 400.

foregoe 1131. 6; Rob. Glouc. 290. fortune. Yfit shall f. us 118 1. 12a; Richardson; Sir T. More in Skeat Specimens (1394-1579) 188 193 'it wold so fortune in few.' founde of almez 188 1. 19; FoxeCattley gloss. s. v. find; Richardson; Northumb. Househ. Book 39, 44, 47 etc.; William of Palerne in Morris-Skeat Specimens 112 141 1.

73. foundryce 223 1. 10. freers observauntes

190 1. 4; cf. Nicolas Privy Purse...of Eliz. of York 56; freres 132 1. 18, 20; freris 1. 21; frers l. 19, 26; Richardson s. v. friar; Coverdale Letters of Martyrs 100 'her monkerye and frerage'; Dyce ind. to Skelton; Stratmann s. v. frêre: Madden Privy purse...of Princess Mary ind. freers, friars. freys 179 1. 31; Nicolas Privy Purse...of H. VIII 321, Privy Purse...of Eliz. of York 45. fringet 131 1. 23.

full truely 75 1. 23, 76 1. 27; f. often

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77 1. 1; f. garnesshed 131 1. 40. fustians 133 1. 16, 134 l. 27; fusteaunces 179 1. 17; ffustions 133 40; Peacock Church Furniture 182, 200, 207; Nicolas ind. to Privy Purse... of Eliz. of York and do. of H. VIII; Stratmann s. v. fustain; Richardson. fynding. exhibicion and f. 156 1. 1; Roy, ed. Arber 102 ad fin. yet their fyndyngis they expende, which shulde the londe defende'; M. A. E. Wood Letters of...royal ladies II 344 concerning his finding and charges, I would be glad ...he should in his youth learn to live according to the portion limited and assigned to him by my lord his father's will'; Sanderson, ed. Jacobson 1 371.

garded 257 1. 33; Skelton, ed. Dyce I 1489 'so many gardes worne' ib. 149 25 'so many garded hose.'

ib. 43 356 'his hose was garded with a lyste of grene'; ib. 49 508 'his hode all pounsed and garded lyke a cage'; Roy, ed. Arber 32 'garded lyverey'; Machyn's Diary 120 bis; Wordsworth Eccl. Biogr. 14 529; North Plutarke (1595) 33 fin.; Richardsons.v. gard; Trench Select Glossary s. v. guard. garnessh 130 1. 11, 131 l. 40, 133 1. 8, 10; garnyssh 130 1. 8, 133 1. 20; Richardson s. v. garnish; Bacon's Essays, ed. Wright 185; Stratmann s. v. garnischin; Testam. Vet. 855 a; Nicolas Privy Purse...of H. VIII 322. garnesshynge 198 1. 18; garnyshing 121 1. 16.

gatt 138 1. 12; Wright Bible Wordbook; Skelton has gat, gate, gatte, gete, gotted (Dyce ind.); Stratmann 238b; Andrewes Sermons (1661)276 p.m. 'when they saw him ...and were thus saluted by him, they gate hope.'

gaufe gave 88 1. 28b; Stratmann

239.

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gaye termes 46 1. 14; Roy, ed. Arber 134 persuasiones gaye'; Wilson in Richardson 'a gay saying.'

gentylwomen 113 1. 9; Chaucer and Gower in Richardson s. v. gentle. gevyn given 64 1. 34; giffen 91 1. 29; Maskell Monum. Rit. II 281 gyffyn.'

ghostly father= confessor 97 1. 26, 98 98 Í. 2, 244 l. 46, 245 1. 2, 250 32; Monk of Evesham, ed. Arber 49 bis; Wordsworth Eccl. Biogr. I 14 226 'their confessor or ghostly father'; ibid. 228; Lewis Life of Fisher II 333, 343; Burnet Hist. Ref. pt. III coll. n. 49 pp. 124 -5.

gild 86 n. 3, 245 l. 36; Northumb.

Househ. Book 347; Rock Church of our fathers II 395-453. girdill 133 1. 2; gyrdell 132 1. 40; gyrdyls 76 1. 28.

gladder 67 1. 21; Richardson cites Rob. Glouc. and Langland; Stratmann 203 b cites Gower. go folowe 65 1. 11.

goddis gen. sin. 92 1. 27; Lydgate Guy of Warwyk, ed. Zupitza 57 I 'by grace of goddis hond'; ib. 7 'by grace of goddys might'; ib. 43 4 goddis promys'; Roy, ed. Arber 72 'enmies agaynst goddis worde allwaye'; ibid. 25. gole 239 1. 25; goyll 53 1. 18. good 67 1. 15 'to beseche you to be his good lord'; Wordsworth Eccl.

Biogr. 14 669 fin. (cf. 679) 'these two gentlemen made intercession unto him to be good lord unto me'; very frequent in letters e.g. in Wood's Letters of royal...ladies; Foxe-Cattley V 539, VII 167, 487, VIII 607; Test. Vetust. 459; Lewis Life of Fisher II 260, 331. goodly adv. = well 118 1. 14a; Lydgate Guy of Warwyk, ed. Zupitza 51-2 'wich in yong age | was stole traytourly | by straunge marchauntis ongoodly lad away'. grandam 259 1. 48; grandame 112 1. 13, 123 1. 15; graundame 153 1. 18; grauntdame 214 1. 37. grasse=grace 49 1. 7. graunten 1561. II.

gree 46 1. 10; Fairfax Tasso III 3, X 10; Richardson; Dyce ind. to Skelton; Chaucer Man of Lawes Tale 259; Coles 'gree, gré Fr. willingness, agreement, satisfaction.'

gret tall, large 48 1. 31.

grevyd 82 1. 33; Promptorium 211 'GREVYD, or a-greuyd yn wrethe, Aggravatus,attediatus'; Stratmann s.v. greven.

hable 69 1. 28, 70 1. 3, 156 1. 37; Todd; Richardson; Jamieson s.v. habil, hable; Stratmann 242; Sir T. More in Skeat Specimens (1394-1579) 185 108 'they were not as yet hable to beare them'; Ascham Scholemaster (1863) 5,

12, 23.

habondant 235 1. 38; Jamieson s. v.

habound; Richardson s. v. abound. haboundance 113 1. 3; Roy, ed. Arber 138 'haboundance and plentuous prosperite'.

hamper 206 1. 32, 209 1. 9; hanaper 236 1. 8; Wood-Bliss A. O. I 404

in the reign of K. Hen. 8 he was clerk of the hamper'; Phillips World of Words Clerk of the hanaper, or hamper, otherwise called Warden of the hamper, an officer in chancery, whose business it is to receive all monies due to the queen for the seals of charters, patents, commissions, and writs, as also fees due to the officers for enrolling and examining the same'; Todd and Richardson s. v. hamper. handez 192 1. 13. hangyd 64 1. 13.

hangyng 133 1. 35; hangynge 66 1.

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William all such stuffe of bedding as he hath now in his chamber of mine; that is to say, a feller, tester and counterpoint of rosemary, a quilt happing, a white mantell, a white square happing; a square happing white and black ... Item to my nephew William Ferrers. . a fedur bedde, a boulster, a blanket, a chike happing'; cf. Phillips World of Words happerlet or hapharlet (old word) a kind of course coverlet for a bed'; Jamieson s. v. hap; Atkinson Cleveland Gloss. s. vv. hap, happings; Stratmann s. v. happen, hap involvere; Promptorium 226-7, 515.

harde clothes wearynge 76 1. 26. hardynesse 11 l. 41 b.

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harnish for a crosstaf 122 1. 18; Richardson s. v. harness; Peacock's Church Furniture 193 'ij verges paynted. . . harnesid at both endes with syluer huntynge horne harnesid with siluer'; ibid. 198 one verge paynted and harnesid at both endes with siluer'; Stratmann s. vv. harneis, harneisin. hatewite 162 l. 17. heere (hair), shertes and gyrdyls of, 76 1. 28; Richardson s. v. hair; Stratmann s. v. hær; Peers the Ploughmans Crede 423; Hall Life of Bp. Fisher in Hearne's Langtoft (1810) 552 b this John lived a solitary and austere life in his private house and cell, saving when he was called abroade to other businesse, punishing himselfe with studie, hard lodging upon the mattes, fasting, praying, wearing of heare shirtes and whipping himself'; Roper Life of Sir T. More, ed. Singer 1822, 47 albeit he appeared outwardly honorable like one of his calling, yet inwardly he, no such vanities esteeming, secretly next his body wore a shirt of hair. which my sister More...in the summer, as he sat at supper singly in his doublet and hose, wearing thereupon a plain shirt without ruff or collar, chancing to espy, began to laugh at it. my wife, not ignorant of his manner, perceiving the same, privily told him of it, and he, being sorry that she saw it, presently amended it. he also sometimes used to punish his body with whips; the cords knotted, which was known only to my

and

wife, his eldest daughter, whom for her secrecy above all other he specially trusted, causing her, as need required, to wash the same shirt of hair'; ibid. 91 'so remained Sir Thomas More in the Tower more than a sevennight after his judgement. from whence, the day before he suffered, he sent his shirt of hair, not willing to have it seen, to my wife'. Langland Piers the plowman v 48. heght=height, top 133 1. 21; Stratmann 254, 257; gloss. to Morris and Skeat Specimens II, and to Skeat Specimens (1394-1579). heierez 155 1. 5; 1. 4 heires. hele 49 1. 4; Skelton Magnyfycence 317-8 MAGN. howe dothe he? wele? FAN. Syr, thanked be God, he hath his hele'; Skelton also uses hayle and heale; FoxeCattley III 299; Richardson s. v. heal; Stratmann s. v. hâle; Wordsworth Eccl. Biogr. 14 344 healefull.

her. the lady Margaret her vow 97 1. 23; Bernh. Schmitz Encyclop. des philolog. Studiums der neueren Sprachen, 2tes Suppl. (Greifswald 1861) 25-6; Burnet Hist. Ref. pt. I II coll. n. 3 pr. the pope his holiness'; Fitzedward Hall Modern English 355-7.

=

her here 82 1. 22; Stratmann 262 a.

herehaught=herald 124 1. 38 a. herte, my good 64 1. 9, my der 1. 26,

66 1. 24; hertes 133 l. 9, 30, 189 1. 17, 22; Stratmann s. v. heorte. hertly 113 1. 15.

hewerry 246 1. 14; Northumb, Househ. Book 16, 94, 217, 321, 362' ewry'.

hir 46 1. 19, 121 l. 1, 2, 130 l. 256, 133 1. 35; Richardson s. v. her; Chaucer Man of Lawes tale 160, 162, 165; cf. ib. 164, 167, 168; Gower Conf. Am. v 138, 328 in Morris and Skeat Specimens II; James I of Scotland in Skeat Specimens 1394-1579 n. 4 154; Lewis Life of Fisher 11 281, 338; Koch 1 469.

his 72 1. 6 couplid evry of them as

well the men as the women with his companyon'.

hit 45 1. 20, 91 1. 33, 35, 92 1. 9 bis, 20, 35, 93 1. 2, 5, 180 1. 20, 189 1.9; Stratmann 253 b; Jamieson s. v. hit; Richardson s. v. it; Koch 1 468—9. hoggys hede 199 1. 5. holdyng memorye 61. 4, 111 1. 20 b.

hole whole 114 1. 37, 122 1. 18, 130 l. 8, 132 1. 15, 133 l. 34, 181 1. 1, 16, 187 l. 2, 189 l. 28, 204 1. 22, 210 1. 17; holle 133 1. 35; see Richardson s. v. whole; Stratmann s. v. hal; Morris and Skeat Specimens II n. 13 538 'holefoted fowle'; Maskell Monum. Rit. II 279; Ascham Scholemaster (1863) 15, 26 (holie=wholly), 18 (holsom); Dyce ind. to Skelton s. vv. hole, holy. holland 244 1. 48; Jewell on I Thess. 4 6 (Works P. S. 857); Wordsworth Eccl. Biogr. 14 584; Richardson; Madden Privy Purse .. of Princess Mary 53. holydome 86 1. 36 b; Foxe-Cattley III 273; Stratmann 246 b; Richardson s. v. halidam; Wordsworth Eccl. Biogr. 14 333; Maskell Monum. Rit. II 291; Roy, ed. Arber 66; Rock Church of our Fathers II 396, 402. hong 137 1. 14; James I of Scotland

in Skeat Specimens (1394—1579) n. 4 159; Stratmann s. v. hangien. hoole whole 209 1. 31, 211 l. 34, 212 1. 30, 214 1. 5, 24; Devyse for the coronation of H. VIII (in Maskell Monum. Rit. II xliii n.) 'hoole pees and goodely concorde'; see Dyce ind. Skelton s.vv.hool,hooly; Northumb.househ. book 39, 159 etc. cf. hole. hopp 133 1. 18.

houghbeyt 83 1. 7; howebeit 96 1. 5. househylde (houzle, hoseli) 77 1. 3, 245 1.5; Grafton contin. of Hardyng 517 'the kyng [R. II] and the quene discended and before the high altare they were both houseled with one hoste, devyded between them'; Coles restricts the sense unwarrantably 'howsel, to administer the sacrament to one on his death-bed'; Phillips World of Words' Huseling-people, communicants. The parishioners of Leominster, in a petition to K. Edward VI, set forth that in their town there were to the number of 2000 husseling-people, i. e. persons that receiv'd the communion'; Nicolas Privy Purse.. of H. VIII 38, 40-1; Foxe-Cattley IV 138, 244; ind. Parker Soc. s. v. housel; Richardson; Todd; Monk of Evesham, ed. Arber 49 ad fin.; Wordsworth Eccl. Biogr. 114 35, 140; Cooper Ath. Cant. I 80 a; Burnet Hist. Ref. pt. 2 1 coll. n. 25 P. 133; Peacock's Church furniture 86, 250 a 'howslinge bell,

the bell which was rung before the eucharist when taken to the sick'. housez 189 1. 7.

hur 179 1. 37, 180 1. 4, 27, 30, 34,

187 1. 33, 36, 191 1. 21; see hir. hytit 188 1.7; Monk of Evesham, ed. Arber 39 fin. 'how be hyt as hyt semyd to me'; see hit and yt.

image=portrait 2001. 40. imbosed-embossed 135 1. 23; Richardson s. v. imboss. in their parte 45 l. 29. inamyld 122 1. 12 etc. inaspeciall 81 1. 38; Halliwell s. v. aspeciall; Richardson cites in especial from Chaucer; cf. astate. incorporate incorporated 1541. 29; W. A.Wright ind. to Bacon's Advancement of Learning; Todd; Richardson.

indigne 45 1. 14; Todd; Richardson; cf. Stratmann s. v. digne. indyfferently 73 1. 24; Trench Select Glossary; Wright's ind. to Bacon's Essays and Advancement; Grosart ind. to Brooke, Crashaw, Donne, Vaughan; Foxe-Cattley VI 277; Todd; Richardson; Wordsworth Eccl. Biogr. 14 600, 620, 624, 625. interesse 154 1. 7, 12, 18; Phillips

World of Words to interess, or interest, to concern, to engage'; Richardson; W. A. Wright glossary to Bacon's Essays. ipocras 46 n. 3, 238 1. 36; Phillips

World of Words hippocras, a

kind of artificial wine made of claret or white-wine and several sorts of spice'; Wood-Bliss A. O. I 499 n.; Cooper's Annals of Cambridge II 171; Machyn's Diary 198-9, 216, 237, 264; Brand Pop. Antiq., ed. Bohn II 137; often in Nichols Progr. of Eliz.

jelofere 133 1. 6; Skelton Garlande of Laurell 983 'the ieloffer wellset'; cf. Dyce II 147 ver. 1052; Bacon's Essayes, ed. Wright 187 in July come gillyflowers of all varieties'; Jamieson s.v. jeroffleris; Richardson s. v. gilly-flowers. jentylmen 240 1. 36; Nic. Udall Roister Doister III 3 21 'beware what ye say (ko I) of such a jentman'; Roger Ascham Scholemaster (1863) jentilnes; 50 jentleshipe. joncryes (joucryes is a misprint in

Baker's ed., corrected by his pen); letter of the prior of Newenham in Maitland Essays on the Ref. 7 'I haue harde sume reporte that when he haue been among lay

persons at festis or yonkeres in the contre he hath had many lewde opinions among the people'; Foxe-Cattley VI 440 marg. junkery; Richardson s. v. juncate, esp. Phaer 'their banquettes they renew, and ionkets courses after meat'; Todd s. v. juncate; Phillips World of Words s. vv. to junket, junkets.

joy, all my worldly 64 1. 7; my very 1. 20; 661. 11; King Lear 1 184; Milton Comus 501.

joyes adj. 46 1. 19.

justs 73 1. 1; Campbell's Materials ▾

97, 206; Richardson s. v. just.

knopp 133 1. 16; knoppis 122 1. 20; Richardson s. v. knob; Stratmann s. v. cnop; Peacock Church Furniture 192 a chalice with a paten thereto belonging of siluer and parcell gilte with a gilte knopp havynge vj roses'; ib. 184, 198, 205, 207.

know. as knoweth the blessed saints 82 1. 13. kyneswomen 113 l. 8.

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lake lack n. s. 156 1. 9; Skelton Garlande of Laurell 70 we fynde in hym grete lake', where it rimes with slake slack; so also blake; Stratmann s. v. lac. lambselner 162 1. 17 (? lambseluer,

i. e. lambsilver?) a customary payment in Kent.

larder, the wette 246 1. 17; see

Bacon in Johnson.

large. a 1. quarter of an houre 79 1. 3. late you wite 236 1. 3; Jamieson (also Suppl.) s. v. lat; Rob. Mannyng of Brunne Handlyng synne 5905 'late me furth go'; Stratmann s. v. laten.

lauly 91 1. 15; Peacock Church Furniture 89 'lawer'; Stratmann s. v. lah; Jamieson (also Suppl.) s. vv. law, lawly, lawlands.

lede, bulles under 153 1. 23; James I of Scotland The Kingis Quhair st. 153 with bakkis blewe as lede'; Stratmann s. v. lead. ledyng-leading, enclosing in lead 1891. 19; Maskell Monum. Ritual. II lxvii (from the Archaeologia I 348) of a deceased king: than led him and cofre him, and in his leed with hym a plate of his stile, name and the date of our Lord gravyn'; Promptorium 292-3 LEEDARE, or plummare (plumbare, s.) Plumbarius', etc.

leke like, please 64 1. 18; Milton P. R. II 382 when and where likes me best.' Andrewes Sermons 309 fin. if that like us.' lenten 131 1. 25; Stratmann s. v. leinten; Richardson s. v. lent; Morris and Skeat Specimens II n. 4 D I'Lenten ys come with loue to toune.

lese lose 82 1. 5; Stratmann s. v. leosen; Richardson s. v. lose; Ascham Scholemaster (1863) 22, 33, 47, 50, 57; Foxe-Cattley ind. s. v. leese; Dyce ind. Skelton s. v. lese.

let hinder 77 1. 7; 82 1. 8; Stratmann 314 a; Dyce ind. to Skelton; Skeat gloss. to Specimens (both series); Fairfax Tasso I 27, XIII 37, XIV 12; Wordsworth Eccl. Biogr. 1 291, 293; Cooper Ath. Cant. I 216 a; Richardson; Todd; Grosart ind. to Sidney, Vaughan and P. Fletcher; Bacon's Essays ed. W. A. Wright, 190; Wright's Bible Wordbook; North Plutarke (1595) 174 fin. let forbear. she wolde not let for any payne or labour, to take upon hande 114 1. 19; Green's Princesses V 53 letted not to speak it'; Wordsworth Eccl. Biogr. 14 591 fin.; Ascham Scholemaster (1863) 22.

lettyrs, like litterae, for a single letter 66 1. 26; but lettyr 67 1. 3; Wordsworth Eccl. Biogr. 1 201, 203.

leve (levy) 7 1. 26.

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lewly lowly 82 1. 8; cf. rewrow; shew and show; shrew pronounced by Shakspere shrow. libbardes 131 1. 6; Foxe-Cattley V 235; Ri. Rolle de Hampole Pricke of Conscience 1228 lyons, libardes and wolwes kene'; Sir T. Elyot The gouernour I 18 'they hunted lions, liberdes and such other bestis'; Todd s. v. libbard; Cowper The Task VI 773 'the lion and the libbard and the bear'; Phillips World of Words; Jamieson (also Suppl.) s. v. libart. like. on the hight of every of their liddes be 1. vnto strawburyes, i. e. are figures like strawberries 131 1. 5.

long. above 1. a month 82 1. 1. low cold, unfriendly? 67 1. 22. loyser leisure 67 1. 2.

lymned 132 1. 37; lymnyd 1. 35; Bacon Advancement IV 2§ 3 'they see learned men's works like the first letter of a patent, or limned

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