Imágenes de páginas
PDF
EPUB

book; which though it have large flourishes, yet it is but a letter'; Richardson s. v. limn; Wood-Bliss A. O. I 115. lynkes 133 1. 1.

lyste 48 1. 29; Grosart ind. to lord Brooke, Ph. Fletcher, Herbert, Sidney, Vaughan; Sanderson, ed. Jacobson I 354; Skelton, ed. Dyce II 211 (lista), 146 (lyst), 196, 263, 269; cf. 207; Fairfax Tasso 1 76; Stratmann s. vv. lust, lusten. lytil servaunt 45 l. 15. lytter 1791. 26; Madden Privy Purse ...of Princess Mary 94, 132, 136.

lyve life 96 1. 14; lyvys 86 1. 35 b; lyve tyme 180 l. 4, 30.

maiestie (see Du Cange)

'for

makyng of a maiestie to hang ouer the toumbe' 189 1. 35; Machyn's Diary 43 (Sir Jo. Haryngton's funeral) 'a herse of wax and a fere mageste and the walans gylded and frynged'; 81 (duchess of Northumberland) " a mageste and the valans. . and a canepe borne over her to the chyrche'; ibid. 90 (queen of Spain) 'the mageste of taffata and the frynge [gold]'; ibid. (SirWm. Laxton); ibid. 148 (king of Denmark)‘a mageste and valans fryng of gold'; ibid. (Anne of Cleves); ibid. 160 (Sir Rob. Rochester) 'a majeste and valanse'; ibid. 239 (earl of Huntingdon) 'a grett mageste of taffata and the valans gylded'; ibid. 243 (lord Montegull) 'a herse and a mageste and valans of sarsenett'; ibid. 244 (Frances countess of Shrowsbere); Leland Collectan. v 318 (queen Mary) 'under the hersse was a great majestie of taffata lyned with bokeram, and in the same was maid a great dome of paynters worke'; Rock Church of our Fathers II 496 seq. the first story of the hearse was ceiled with an awning of silk, hung all about with scocheoned valance, and this testerlike covering was known as the "majesty". this term came, in all likelihood, to be given to this silken ceiling, because, in most instances, the eternal Father, crowned with the papal tiara, and mantled in a splendid cope, like the supreme pontiff, was figured upon the under side, so as to seem looking down, with mild forgiveness, while he absolved, by a

blessing from the three outstretched fingers of his uplifted right hand, the soul of the individual whose corpse lay just below. the Day of Doom, or last judgement was sometimes painted there, as we find by' Leland Collect. just cited. maistris 113 1. 6; Stratmann s.v. maistresse; Roy, ed. Arber 107 'mastres'; Richardsons.v. master; Dyce ind. to Skelton s.v. mastres, maistres,maystresse; Madden Privy Purse...of Princess Mary 51, 53, IOI; Jamieson s. v. maistryss. mancypill 256 1. 33; Todd s. v. manciple; Phillips World of Words 'a caterer, or one that buys the common provisions in a college at the universities, or in an hospital: the steward of the Temple was also anciently call'd by that. name'; Foxe-Cattley II 527. manner, all manner causes 91 1. 23; 205 1. 8, 210 1. 12 etc.; Burnet Hist. Ref. pt. 1 II coll. n. 23 p. 61 pr. any manner negligence'; Ascham's Scholemaster (1863) 169, 260; Hooker e. p. II 7 § 4 'no manner force'; Jewell on 1 Thess. 2 II; Fairfax Tasso XVII 3; Montagu against Selden 425 'another manner truth'; Andrewes Sermons (1661) 587 pr.; Roister Doister V 3.

[ocr errors]

margarettes 122 1. 26 and n. 3, 130 1. 21, 133 1. 19; margaritt 1. 23; Promptorium 326; Tho. Cooper dedication of his Thesaurus (1552) to Edw. VI 'the precious margarite sapience'; Todd s. v. margarite; here daisy ; see the bunches of daisies over the gates of Christ's and St John's colleges. maseboke 132 1. 9; Peacock's Church Furniture 43 Item a masseboke broken and cut in peces by John Normanton churchwarden'; see almost every page of the book. maternal tongue 45 1. 18, 113 1.9; Burnet Hist. Ref. pt. 1 III coll. n. 15 the king's letters patents for printing the Bible in English 'the free and liberal use of the Bible

in our own maternal English tongue'.

matynes of our Lady 75 1. 17, 243 1. 33; of the daye 1. 19; Sir T. More Workes 1120 'scrape clene the letany out of euery booke with our lady mattens and the dyrige to'; Maskell Monum. Ritual. II prints a primer of the 14th century, commencing 'Here bigynnen matyns of our ladi.'

Maundy 77 n. 4; Phillips World of Words s. v. Mandy Thursday; Stratmann s.v. mande; Todd s. v. Maunday-Thursday; Richardson s. v. Maundy; Barlow Brutum Fulmen 169; ind. to Parker Soc. and to Foxe-Cattleys.vv. Maundy, Maundy Thursday; Wordsworth Eccl. Biogr. 14 617 'upon Maunday Thursday he made his Maundy there in our Ladies chappelle, having fifty-nine pore men, whose feet he washed and kissed; and after he had wiped them, he gave every of the saide pore men twelve pence in money, three ells of good canvass to make them shirtes, a paire of new shoes, a cast of red herrings and three white herrings, and one of them had two shillings;' Rock Church of our Fathers III (2) 235 -9, 848; Machyn's Diary 230; Northumb. Househ. Book 354-6. meane n. s. 92 1. 13; Skeat Specimens (1394-1579) ind.; FoxeCattley gloss. s. v. mean; W. A. Wright gloss. to Bacon's Essays and Advancement; Richardson and Todd s. v. mean; Wordsworth Eccl. Biogr. 1 651 pr. 'I desire you...to be a meane for me, that I may aunswer unto my accusations before the king's majestie'; cf. Fisher cited under medyatryce. meanes, make 6 1. 25; cf. FoxeCattley II 582; Two Gent. of Verona V 4137; Andrewes Sermons (1661) 309 pr. 'not so much as Goodwife Zebedees two sons (that smelt of the fisher-boat) but meanes was made for them to sit there.' medyatly = immediately 189 1. 3; Jamieson (cf. Suppl.) MEDIAT, immediate; next in succession.' John Darby's account of Father Raby's appearing to him and telling him that bishop Fisher was next to the angels in heaven (printed in Lewis Life of Fisher II 381) 'and mediately he dyed the same nyght'; Speed (1632) 1020 a 'that ye assemble your selues together mediately vpon racepete hereof'; so Machyn Diary 36—7, 119, 122 bis, 134, 198, 202 bis, 210, 212, 221 'contenent'incontinently. medyatryce 114 1. 36; Fisher Seven Psalmes (1509) f. ee VI r° ‘O blyssed lady be thou meane and mediatrice bytwene thy sone and wretched synners'; Lydgate in Richardson s.v. mediate; for the form cf. foundrice.

mennys men's 82 1. 6; Fisher to Cromwell in Lewis Life of Fisher II 402 'not that I condeme eny other menys conscyence, there conscyence maye save theme, and myne must save me.' merry-andrew 245 l. 3. mervayle. no m. though 76 1. 4; Chaucer Nonne Preestes Tale 256 'a gret mervayle'; Stratmann 343 a. messagez 184 1. 35; messuagez 185 1. 37; cf. usuage.

=

meyte adj. meet 134 1. 26. middes midst 132 1. 11; myddes

130 1 38, 131 1. 21; Ascham Scholemaster (1863) xx ‘in middes of outward injuries and inward cares'; Jamieson s. v. myddis; Rob. Glouc. myddes (ap. Richardson s.v. mid); James I of Scotland The Kingis Quhair st. 159 3 myddis; Sir Jo. Mandeville prol. in Morris and Skeat Specimens n. 14 a 38 'Ierusalem, that is the myddes of the world'; Chaucer The Nonne Prestes Tale 228 middes; gloss. to Wycliffe Bibles. v. mydde; Peacock Church Furniture 192, 195, 199; Stratmann s. v. midde. millon=melon (Palsgrave) 134 1. 14; Howes Annals (1631) 1038 'musk-millions'.

misrule, abbot or lord of 47 n. 3; misrewle 187 1. 40; Northumberland household book 344; WoodBliss A.0.1 446, 456, 665; Green's Princesses IV 110; Cardwell Docum. Ann. I 372; Cooper Ath. Cant. 1 387 ter; Collier Annals of the Stage; Cunningham Revel Accounts; Grindal P. S. 141, 175; Machyn's Diary 13, 28-9, 33, 125, 157, 162, 273-4, 328, 337. moche 77 1. 5; Stratmann s. v. muche; ind. to Dyce's Skelton and gloss. to Morris and Skeat Specimens II s.v. moche; Wycliffe Matt. 67; cf. Eph. 3 10 (mochefold); Richardson s.v. much. moder 61 1. 2, 60 1. 2 (gen. Rob. of Glouc. in Morris and Skeat Specimens II n. 1b 3 'in his moder wombe'; other exx. in names of relationship from Rob. Glouc. in Koch 1 415; from other authors in Mätzner Sprachproben 1 (2) 256; cf. quarter), 91 1. 13, 37, 114 1. 27, 123 1. 14, 129 l. 27, 235 1. 17; modyer 67 1. 34; modyr 64 1. 36, 66 1. 21; Jamieson s. v. modyr; Richardson s. v. mother; cf. deck thatch; dorp thorp; murder murther; quod quoth; fader

father; glossary to Wycliffe Bible s.v. moder; Chaucer Nonne Prestes tale 475 'eke your moder of hire gentilesse'; Stratmann s.v. moder. moderly 91 1. 35; Lydgate in Richardson s.v. mother.

[ocr errors]

moneth minde 123 1. 12; month's mind 225 1. 47, 2261. 13; mounth mynd 184 1. 9; mounths mynd 1. 22; Northumberland Household Book 336 my lords father xij month mynde'; cf. Percy's n. p. 437; ind. Parker Soc. s.v. minds; Trevelyan papers (Camd. Soc.) I 66-7; Machyn's Diary 2, 9, 24, 29, 69, 70, 100, 113, 128, 152, 154, 163, 175; ib. 141 'the ij-yere myne of good master Lewyn'; Rock Church of our Fathers II 314-7, 516-9; M. A. E. Wood Letters of royal...ladies II 144, 264; Todd; Fabyan in Richardson; Nares.

mor 81 1. 17; Morris Story of Gen. and Ex. 993; more. a m. somme 191 1. 33, 198 1. 30, 206 1. 21, 207 1. 7; Richardson and Todd S. v. more; Wordsworth Eccl. Biogr. 1 218 n., 219 n. ('the more curse'), 398 fin., 498 fin.; Mountagu ag. Selden 236 a more sacrifice (πλείονα θυσίαν); ib. 470 'a more impossibilitie'; gloss. Wycliffe Bible s. v. more; Bacon's Essays 43 p. 177 Wright; Tyndal P. S. II 228; Mätzner III 261; Burnet Hist. Ref. pt. 2 I coll. n. 42 p. 185, 48 p. 196. mortemaign 138 l. 36.

most. the crown of m. glory 83 1.

15; Chaucer in Richardson; Wycliffe Matt. 13 32; Roister Doister, ed. Arber 66; Burnet Hist. Ref. pt. 3 III coll. n. 63 p. 154 f. ' employ your most diligence'; ibid. Vi coll. n. 53 p. 280 'to their own most advantage'; W. A. Wright gloss. to Bacon's Essays; Mätzner III 262-3. mycull=great 20 1. 19. mysch 249 1. 48; Fisher (in Lewis

Life of Fisher 11 279, 280) myche; gloss. to Wycliffe Bible s. v myche; Dyce ind. to Skelton s.vv. myche, mytche.

[merged small][ocr errors]

linnen-clothery, or table-linen'; Testam. Vet. 453, 603; Lat. mappa, Fr. nappe, naperie. naturall souerayne lorde 112 1. 14; Burnet Hist. Ref. pt. 1 III coll. n. 16 pr. the attainder of Thomas Cromwell 'your most royal majesty, our natural sovereign lord'; ibid. pt. 2 I. coll. n. 44 p. 187; ibid. I coll. n. 21 p. 291 ad fin. 'my most redoubted sovereign and natural liege lord'; ibid. pt. 3 III coll. n. 61 p. 149, v coll. n. 39 fin. p. 254, VI coll. n. 54 p. 284 pr. ne nor 46 1. 13, 81 1. 19, 23, 114 1. 4, 6; Fairfax Tasso IX 20; Dyce ind. to Skelton; Stratmann; Todd; Richardson; Grosart ind. to Sidney. necessarez 196 1. 16, 197 1. 17; necessariez 195 1. 28, 198 1. 8. nedyr neither 64 1. 22; Eglamour 883 neydur; cf. moder, oder. no=not 131 1. 40; Mätzner III 130; Andrewes Serm. (1661) 462 'no do?' Mountagu ag. Selden 37 'no doe?' Sanderson, ed. Jacobson, I 360 'no is?' cf. III 344; Roister Doister, ed. Arber 27, 37. not. unkynde she wolde not be unto no creature 114 1. 3; Mätzner III 126-7; so ne is often found with another negative (as in early Du.) Morris and Skeat Specimens II n. 19 159, 209, 217, 280, 292, 435, 437, 483; Wordsworth Eccl. Biogr. 1 421 ne none; ib. 368 ne not; so nor, Andrewes Sermons (1661) 639 neither Jesus nor our Lady blessed the birth no better'; Wordsworth Eccl. Biogr. 14 223 fin., 271 fin., 391, 335, 344 pr.; Bacon's Advancement 120 Wright. nunnys 132 1, 27; Skelton has

nonys.

obligatory. wrytings obl. = bonds 92 1. 34.

observaunce=observants 258 1. 29. observauntes. freers o. 190 1. 4. cf. lettres patentes, friars minors, heirs males (this last nine times in Edward's devise for the succession, Burnet Hist. Ref. pt. 3 IV coll. n. 10 p. 214) for the double plural form; and on the subject ind. Parker Soc. s. v. observants; Roy, ed. Arber 75-107. occupye her devocyons 76 1. 3; cf. 1. 12, 77 1. 4, 132 1. 15 copys occupyed in our chapell; Ascham Scholemaster (1863) xvi 'to occupie my tonge'; ib. 31 'like a new bright silver dishe never

occupied'; Dyce ind. to Skelton; Todd; Richardson; Jewell on I Tim. 4 6 (P. S. 867); Trench Select Glossary.

oder 118 1. 26a, 153 1. 22, 154 1.

29, 155 1. 2; odyr 66 1. 29, 67 1. 20; Skelton Magnyfycence 391 'thus is the talkynge of one and of oder'; cf. nedyr.

of. y humbly beseche your grace of pardon 66 1. 33; 91 1. 15, 38; crye of Jhesu for helpe 113 1. 3; Gower in Richardson s. v. beseech; Fitzedward Hall Modern Engl. 244-5 cites 'to set eyes of her', 'to call (or to wait) of a person'; Marg. Ascham dedic. to The Scholemaster trustynge of the continuance of your good memorie of M. Ascham and his'; Tho. Crumwell in Burnet Hist. Ref. pt. 3 III coll. n. 68 p. 164 pr. 'most humbly beseeching your majesty of pardon'; bp. Thirlby ibid. n. 74 p. 187 fin. 'the emperor prayed me of patience'; W. A. Wright gloss. to Bacon's Essays. office (?)=officer 69 1. 27. officez 188 1. 10.

offried 131 1. 28; Roquefort s. v. orfrais; Halliwell s. v. orfrays; Todd s. v. orphrays; Richardson s.v. orphray; Jamieson suppl. s.v. orphis; Ducange s.vv. aurificium, aurifrigium, orificium; Phillips World of Words 'Orfraies, a kind of frizzled cloth of gold, much worn heretofore in England by our kings and nobility: the coatarmours of the kings guards were also termed orfraies, upon account of their being adorned with goldsmiths work'; Alysaunder 179; Diez Wörterb. 13 190, 113 389.

on the day = daily 76 1. 23; cf. 'on days' and 'on nyghtes' in Morris and Skeat gloss. to Specimens II; Mätzner II 371 cites Towneley Myst. 101 'we that walk on the nyghtys'; Stratmann 23a; ind. to Morris and Skeat Specimens II. on one 130 1. 6, 10, 15, 20, 29, 35, 135 1. 5, 6, 9, 153 1. 19; Richardson s. v. one; Stratmann s. v. an; Peres the Ploughmans crede 789 'on amonge an hol hundred'; ind. to Morris and Skeat Specimens II (add 18 b 123, 124). ony 76 1. 15, 17, 81 1. 25, 111 1. 41b, 113 l. 21, 114 1. 4, 15, 16; Dyce ind. to Skelton; Wycliffe Ja. 1 5-6; Mätzner Sprachproben II 29b.

[blocks in formation]

oonly 81 1. 29; gloss. to Wycliffe Bible s.vv. oonli, oonlypi.

or before 93 1. 8, 138 1. 14; or that 137 1. 18, 138 l. 17; Grosart ind. to Brooke, Donne, Fletcher; Foxe-Cattley VI 73, 697 with many other exx. in ind.; Wordsworth Eccl. Biogr. 14 276, 301, 612; Wright Bible-Wordbook; Chaucer Man of Lawes 573 or that it were eue'; Mätzner Sprachproben II 31; Stratmann 16a; Todd; Richardson; Jamieson. ordeign 157 1. 5.

ornamentez 182 1. 6.

[ocr errors][merged small]

pacion, pagentes of the 131 1. 26. pagentes of the pacion 131 1. 26;

Dyce ind. to Skelton s. vv. pagent, pageyond, pajantes, pajauntes, pajauntis, pajaunttis.

paled 131 1. 16, 22, 133 l. 32, 134 1. 19; Richardson; Todd; Phillips World of Words; Coles pale, two perpendicular lines from the top to the bottom of the escutcheon'; Peacock Church Furniture 184 'vj autre towells of lynen clothe, the first with a frontere paled rede and black of welvet and cloyth of golde'; ibid. 181, 182, 232, 251.

palfrays 181 1. 8; Promptorium 379; Diez Wörterb. 13 301; Richardson; Stratmann s.v. palefrai; Wordsworth Eccl. Biogr. 1 529 'a hundred and more of ladies and gentlewomen following, every one riding upon white palfreies'; Lat. paraveredus; Germ. Pferd; Wycliffe Esth. 611; Wackernagel Voc. opt. 7 (Diez); Northumb. Househ. Book 55.

parcell (or parcells) gilt 131 1. 1, 133 1. 9, 134 1. 23, 135 1. 9, 10 )( gilt all 130 1. 15; full gilt 1. 7; all gylt 1. 20; all gilt 1. 39, 131

1. 36; Grosart ind. to Donne; parcelles, books of 208 1. 3, 18, 209 1. 3; parcellis 193 1. 32; parcellys 199 1. 19; Northumberland Household Book 181, 198-9 and often; Grosart ind. to Herbert; Dyce ind. to Skelton; Sanderson, ed. Jacobson III 109, 119; Bacon's Advancement, ed. Wright I IS 3 P. 7; Coles parcel-maker, an exchequer officer making the parcels of the escheators accounts'; Richardson.

parker 237 1. 26, 238 l. 6; Promp

torium 384; Campbell's Materials for hist. H. VII I 33—4, 36; ib. 560 parkership; Todd; Skelton Garlande of Laurell 1386 'But, lorde, how the parker was wroth with all!'

parteyner 156 1. 24; Richardson

S. v. part; Maskell Mcnum. Rit. II 77 n. 14b 'cause them to be made parteyners with thy sayntes'; The Nut-brown Maid 91 'partynere.' partye. in p. of payment 198 1. 29; Richardson s.v. part; Trevisa in Morris and Skeat Specimens II n. 18a 202 'vndur the same party of heuene'; Chaucer Knightes Tale

2150.

passe tyme 45 1. 24; Richardson s. v. pastime.

pastrye 2461. 15; Northumb. Househ. Book 181 'the yoman or grome of paistry'; Gutch Collect. Cur. II Io; Howell's Letters I 57; Dryden in Richardson s. v. paste. paten 130 l. 11, 12; patent 122 1. 25, 28, 30; Peacock Church Furniture 88 'two chalyces of silver there patente'; Scudamore Notitia Eucharist. 490-6; Burnet Hist. Ref. pt. 2 I collect. n. 33 § 2 'blessing his eyes with the paten or sudary, or crossing his head with the paten.' patentes. lettres p. 153 1. 31, 154 1.

14, 23; for the double pl. cf.

friars observants.

patron pattern 201 1. 5; Promptorium 386 'PATRONE, forme to werk by (patrone, or exawmplere, K. exsaumpyl, H. patron or example, P.) Exemplar'; Toulmin Smith Engl. gilds 321. patroness 114 1. 28, 121 1. 32b; Promptorium 386 'PATRONESSE, Patronissa (patrona, P.)' paxbrede 131 1. 33; Todd s.v. pax; Scudamore Notitia Eucharistica 439-441; Peacock Church Furniture 182 'a pax bread copper and

[blocks in formation]

pencells 189 1. 22; Chaucer Tr. and Cr. 1043 'she made him wear a pencell of her sleve'; Lat. pannus, M. Lat. penuncellus; Roquefort s.vv. pennon, pannonceau, penen; Jamieson s. v. penseil; Laurence Minot in Morris and Skeat Specimens n. II c. 46; Rock Church of our Fathers II 497-8; Leland Collectan. V 318; Machyn Diary xxviii, 13 quater, 19 septies, 20 quater, 40, 43, 57, 71, 80, 81, 90, 94, 96, 102, 108, 111, 113, 115—6, 126-8, 133, 135, 148 ter, 173. perced 113 1. 1; Chaucer Cant. tales prol. 2; Dyce ind. to Skelton. perceyeued=gotten 156 1. 4; Jamieson Suppl. perceptionne, the act of gathering or receiving rents'; Littré s.vv. perceptible, perception, percevable, percevoir.

perceyving understanding 5 1. 15. perffirmyng 187 1. 14.

perfitt 93 1.4; Jamieson (also suppl.); Richardson s.v. perfect; Grosart ind. to Donne s. v. perfit and to Sidneys. v. perfet; Ascham's Scholemaster (1863) 6, 8 'perfitlie'; ibid. 10 'perfitness'; Stratmann 381b parfit.

personage 49 1. 1, 1831. 15. personez 183 1. 21.

Pewe, Lady of 56 l. 5 and n. 2, 106 1. 8; Rites of Durham, Surtees Soc. no. XV. 32-3 'our Lady of Pitties alter'; Peacock Church Furniture 237 'on tabernacle of our lady of pytye'; Burnet Hist. Ref. pt. 2 I collect. n. 26 p. 150 'to all them that be in the state of grace, that daily say devoutly this prayer before our blessed Lady of pity, she will shew them her blessed visage and warn them the day and the hour of death'; Jamieson suppl. s. v. pietie. piety 131 1. 17: 'ymayge of Seynt Gregories piety.

pillous 133 l. 4, 15, 27. pipes (furniture of the staff of a cross) 122 1. 19.

pity, our Lady of, see Pewe. placez 188 1. 36, 24.

plakarde 194 1. 37, 195 1. 5; Foxe

Cattley iv 394, 735, VIII 516. plegges 213 I. 18; laide to plegge

« AnteriorContinuar »