Imágenes de páginas
PDF
EPUB
[blocks in formation]

tissue 131 1. 19.

to. texamyn 230 l. 4; so in Skeat Specimens (1394—1579) tappease, tencombre, tendure, tenform, tenrage.

toallie towels 250 1. 39.

to fore before adv. 45 1. 19; conj. 46 1. 6; Stratmann 502 b; Fairfax Tasso I 35, 37; Morris and Skeat Specimens II gloss.; Jamieson; Richardson; Foxe-Cattley II 270, 735; Chaucer Melibeus 101. to gethers 133 1. 11; Foxe-Cattley VI 178, 264; Chaucer Tr. and Cr. IV 1322.

too two 132 1. 12; Stratmann 5II a.

tormaday 46 1. 4.

torcheberers 189 1. 14; Merchant of Venice II 4 4, 24, 40; II 6 40; Romeo and F. III 5 14; Machyn's Diary 400.

torchez 189 1. 17. townykilles 131 1 27; tunykkylles

132 1. 12; tunyncles 1. 7; Burnet Hist. Ref. pt. 1 III collect. 3 s. 5 P. 153 one cope of silver tissue with one chesible and one tunicle of the same; one cope of gold tissue with one chesible and two tunicles of the same'; Rock Church of our fathers I 383401; Marriott's Vestiar. Christian. 225-6; Peacock's Church Furniture 88, 128, 159; Scudamore's Notit. Eucharist. 92-4; Ellis Orig. Letters (1) I 189. tractable 114 l. 12. traifoilles 135 1. 22; Peacock Church Furniture 181, 182 bis, 184 bis. transytorye 46 1. 20.

trasshe 181 1. 8, 183 l. 14; Richardson; Peacock Church Furniture 171.

travessis 179 1. 18; Hartuelli Regina Literata 1564 in Nichols Progr. of Eliz. 1 10 'incedunt turbae, turbis praeeuntibus ipsa | paulatim ex oculis Elizabetha perit. | iam secreta preces geminat; secretior illi, delubrum aulaeo ductile [marg. vulgo Traverse], byssus erat, qualia puniceis Priami tentoria velis, qualia Martis erant et Iovis esse queant'; Entertainments at Cambridge 1564 (in Nichols 11): 'the whole quire begun to sing in English a song of gladness; and so went orderly into their stalls in the quire... Which [evensong] being ended the queen's majestie came forth of her traverse'; Dyce's Skelton II 106; Green's Princesses IV 77, 92, 156, V III-2; Wordsworth Eccl. Biogr. 14 544 (quater), 649 'there was also in the middest of the same gallery a traverse of sarsenet drawne; so that the one end thereof was preserved for my lord, and the other for the earle'; Nicolas Privy Purse of Elizabeth of York 259; Blomefield's Norfolk III 216; Todd; in the coronation service of Qu. Victoria (Maskell Monum. Rit. III II2) 'the traverse in king Edward's chapel'; Testam. Vet. 423.

trentalls 106 1. 34 a; trintallez 189 1. 3; Jewell on 2 Thess. ii 10 P. S. 922; Skelton (1 168 seq. Dyce) a deuoute trentale for old John Clarke, sometyme the holy patriarke of Dis'; ind. Cardwell Docum. Ann.; Rock Church of our fathers II 504 'a trental (thirty) of masses used to be offered up for almost every one on the burial day'; Richardson; Nares; Machyn's Diary 98, 161; Burnet Hist. Ref. pt. 2 I n. 52 pr. 'trentals of communions'; ind. Parker Soc.

tronage 217 1. 8; Coles 'Trona, a weigh-beam; tronage, custom for weighing wool; tronator, a London officer weighing wool'; Jamieson (also suppl.) s. v. trone. truncagium 220 1. 8; Ducange s.vv. trona, tronagium, truncagium. tune tun 255 1. 5, 26.

tymez 188 1. 25, 36, 194 l. 11, 195 1. 3.

tyncell 131 1. 22; Fairfax Tasso II 5. tynctur 255 1. 20.

unce ounce 122, 130-135 passim, 235 1. 33-46; uncez 195 1. 11;

Peacock Church Furniture 1908 passim. vnderstonden 46 1. 16; Stratmann 536 b.

unhable 83 1. 1; Jamieson (also Suppl.) s. v. vnhabill; Richardson s. v. unhabile; Burnet Hist. Ref. pt. 3 IV coll. n. 8 p. 204 'judge him as unhable, and a recusant'; cf. Andrewes Serm. (1661) 394 p. m. 'hability.'

untyll, that questyon made u. her 1131. 15; Jamieson; see till. uprysyng 75 1. 14; Wordsworth Eccl. Biogr. 14 627 leaving all the gentlemen and his household at Southwell in their beddes, not knowing of my lord his sodain departure, who expected his up. rising until eight of the clock";' ibid. 361 resurrection, as in two creeds in Maskell Monum. Rit.

II 240.

=

usuage 97 1. 31; cf. messuagez.

velom 132 1. 35, 37, 38, 133 1. 5,

134 1. 21; velome 132 1. 33; volume 208 1. 9; Peacock Church Furniture 199 'iiij prynted masse bookes of velom large'; Sir Ph. Sidney Astrophel and Stella II 'gilded leaues or colourd velume'; Phineas Fletcher upon Mr Per kins his printed sermons (III 263 Grosart) Perkins-our wonderliving, though long dead, | in this white paper, as a winding sheet,

and in this velome lies enveloped.'

vengeable 114 1. 6; Occleve De regim. princ. 298 'hir vengeable duresse'; Todd; Foxe-Cattley IV 660; J. C. Hare Fragm. of two essays in Engl. Philol. Camb. 1873 II 76; Richardson. veray 114 1. 5, 28; verayly 113 1.

18; verray 70 l. 2; verrayly 92 1. 19, 93 1. 3; veryly 64 1. 25; Chaucer Prol. 72 'he was a verray perfit gentle knight'; ibid. 337-8

that heeld opinioun that pleyn delyt was verraily felicite perfyt'; id. Man of Lawes Tale 167 'hir herte is verray chambre of holynesse'; Occleve De regim. princ. 298 'this londes verray tresour and richesse'; Stratmann 541 b; Richardson s. v. very. verder 133 1. 39; verdour 1. 12, 34,

36, 134 1. 19, 179 l. 1—3, 11, 14; Nicolas Wardrobe Accounts of E. IV 121, 137, 146; Jamieson. verger 182 1. 18; Peacock Church Furniture 198.

vertuose 961. 1, 12; vertuosely 1. 3. vestrie 246 l. 14; Promptorium 509; Northumb. Househ. Book 48. vice 113 l. 14; Halliwell the cock or tap of a vessel.'

vitalls 72 1. 8; Stratmann 542 a; Jamieson (also Suppl.) s. v. victual Buchan-vittal'; Richardson s. v.. victual; The Nut-brown maid 104 'ne may not fayle of good vitayle'; Chaucer Man of Lawes Tale 499, Prol. 569, 749. void 73 1. 19; voyde 48 1. 5 and n. I, 239 1. 7.

wagez 199 1. 28.

walyauntnes 45 1. 26; Richardson s. v. valiant; Wright Bible- Wordbook s. v. valiantness.

war were, would be 139 1. 18. wareness 114 l. 13.

wayte. lay in as grete w. of her self 76 1. 15.

weale of my sinfull soule 97 1. 28; cf. 118 1. 10 a, 20 a, 17 b. wedelode, a custom of Kent 162 1. 17.

weyf 164 1. 24; Jamieson (also Suppl.) s.v. waff; Todd s. v. waif; Richardson s. v. wave.

whan 77 1. 7, 9, 113 l. 15; Grosart

ind. to Donne; Richardson s. v. when; Stratmann 284 b. whear whereas 153 1. 23; wher 229 1. 35; wher that 64 1. 9; where 129 1. 19; North Plutarke (1595) 353 For iustice maketh the life of a noble man, and of one in great authoritie, seeme diuine and celestial: where without iustice and dealing vniustly, his life is most beastly, and odious to the world.'

wiche which 137 1. 5, 7, 21. wol will 4 1. 21, 25, 118 1. 14 a; woll 4 l. 40 b (=wills), 96 1. 6, 129 1. 22; wolle 92 1. 25; woule 1. 14; wull 64 1. 26, 67 1. 1; Chaucer Man of Lawes Tale 663 'if this knight wol sweren'; gloss. to Wycliffe Bible s. v. wiln; Stratmann 564 b; Dyce ind. Skelton s. vv. woll, wull; Richardson s.v. will.

[blocks in formation]
[ocr errors]

1. 32; Piers the Ploughmans Crede 788 and werchen and wolward gon'; Richardson s. v. wool. wrackys 240 1. 35, 37; wrakkys 1. 33; Stratmann 574 a. Grosart ind. to Crashaw and Sidney; Richardson s. v. wreck. writhen (wrethen) 135 1. 22, 258 1. 31; Fairfax Tasso x 9 'writhen.' wyllys 81 1. 35 'wyllys they'= if they will.

wymmen 45 1. 22; Stratmann 562 a; Richardson s. v. woman. wysse 64 1. 20.

wytnessyth. as w. nether fewe nor small your gracious memorialse 82 1. 21.

y=I 64 1. 7 and passim; 66 1. 13 etc.; Monk of Evesham, ed. Arber 50 after that y had resceyuyd the good lorde that y can not remembre withowte grete horror and heuynes, y was drawyn of an euyl custome as y seyd afore.' yche=each 133 1. 28.

ye=yea 86 1. 45a; Rastell Chron.

274 (of Edw. IV) 'syttyng in the seate royall, in the great hall of Westmyster, with his septer in his hand, a question was axed of all the people, yf they wolde admitte hym to continue as kynge: to the whiche, with one voyce, all the people cryed there, ye'; so at the coronation of H. VI (Maskell Monum. Rit. III 72) the abp. of Canterbury proclaimed: if ye hold pays with hym say, yea, and holde vp

handes. and than all the people cried with oon voyce, ye, ye'; so in the Devyse of Henry VIII (ibid. 73) the abp. was to ask: 'woll ye serue at this tyme, and geve your wills and assents to the same consecration, envnction and coronacion? Wherunto the people shall say with a grete voyce: ye, ye, ye, so be it, Kyng Henry, King Henry.'

yeef=give 184 1. 24; yeve 64 1. 31; yeven 70 1. 9, 182 l. 2, 25, 183 1. 1, 187 1. 14, 25, 188 1. 20, 190 1. 9, 236 1. 11; Stratmann 239; cf. yeldhall = guildhall in Machyn's Diary 108 etc.

yen (the yen i. e. theyen, the eyen) 45 1. 33; Monk of Evesham, ed. Arber 51f. 'in the space of a twynkelyng of an ye'; ibid. 110 'myn yes opinde to the vse of seying'; ibid. 21 bis 'yes.' yerdes 208 1. 39; yerdez 189 1. 30; Stratmann 238.

[ocr errors]

yeve if 64 1. 17, 30; Monk of Eves

ham 50 'yeffe'; ibid. 111 'yefe'; ibid. 29 'yef'; Stratmann 239. yey=they 129 1. 25. ymage of the Trinite 122 1. 26, 130 1. 22; of the crucifix 122 l. 27, 130 1. 23, 131 1. 21; of Seynt Gregories piety 131 1. 17; for crystez collegge 186 1. 16.

yn=in 131 1. 31, 132 1. 38; Monk of Evesham 22, 110 etc.

ypocrace 238 1. 38; ypocras 1. 40. ys is 180 1.30; Monk of Evesham 23. ytit 137 1. 20, 191 1. 33; Monk of Evesham 51.

INDEX.

Abdike hundred Som. 16 1. 24.
Achirche 35 1. 29; Achurch 69 1. 8;

218 1. 22; Achurche 218 1. 22;
Achwich 227 1. 38, 228 1. 42.
Acres, the master of St Thomas of
225 1. 39.

Addesham 162 1. 12.

Addirton, lady Margaret's servant
249 1. 42.

Ade, Thos., regular brother of St
Mary's Ospringe (temp. Edw. IV)
139 1. 8, II.
Agmondesham 54 1. 22.

Agnes, St 214 1. 6, 232 1. 14. See
Annes.

Alban's, St, convent of, dispute be-
tween it and lady Margaret 65 1.
24; bequest to the 'ancores' there
132 1. 28.

Alcock, Jo. bp. Ely, founds Jes.
coll. 1496 58 1. 21; cf. 256 1. 47.
Aldwyncle 69 1. 9; Alwincle 217
1. 35; Aldewyncle 1. 22, 222 1.
34-6.

Alexander VI, pope, contemplates a
crusade 65, 241-2.
Alflodnasse 254 l. 16.

Allerton hundred Dev. 17 1. 2.
alms 188 1. 34, 190 l. 3, 9.
almsmen and women 37.

Amesbury 51 1. 7.

Ancaster 86 1. 6.

anchorites 256 1. 45.

Andreas, Bern. 232 1. 9.

Andrews, abp. of St, Margaret
queen of Scots gives him a prayer-
book 88 n. I.

Annes Agnes to n. 1, 67 1. 30.
anniversaries II 1. 31, 62 1. 3, 107
1. 13; twenty established by H.
VII 95 1. 5; for lady Margaret at
Westminster 105 1. 6.
Anthony, St 76 1. 24.
apparel, mourning, ordinances for
53-4.

Arthur, prince 66 1. 2, 70 l. 16,
232 1. 3, 22, 243 1. 3; birth and
baptism 34-5; his marriage with
Catharine of Arragon 71—3.
Arundell, earl of (temp. H. IV) 231
1. 6; (1620) 52 l. 17 b.

Ashby, Geo. 98 1. 45 a.
Ascham, Roger 238 1. 34.
Asellis, Simon de, official of [Hugh
Balsham] bp. of Ely 175 1. 28.
Ashton, Hugh 153 1. 16, 181 1. 11,
12, 188-190, 206 l. 19, 23, 36,
212 1. 14, 213 1. 11, 216 1. 13,
217 1. 46, 223 l. 25, 46, 225 l. 35,
2261. 45, 227 1. 18; prebendary of
St Stephen's Westm. 254 1. 34;
chapl. of Cresmere 1. 41; building
accounts of his chapel 254-5;
lands bought for 255 1. 37; comp-
troller of lady Margaret's house-
hold, one of her exors. 119 1. 17
and n. 3, 141 1. 4, 142 l. 34, 143
1. 18, 40, 144 1. 17.

Ashton, Ri., abbot of Peterborough,
wins an action against lady Mar-
garet 68 1. 33.

Atkynson, Rob. notary public 161

1. 21.

Atkynson, Wm. D.D., his transla-
tion of 'The Imitation of Christ'
printed under lady Margaret's
patronage 87.
Atwicke 178 1. 20.
Atwode, Jo. 186 1. 25.

ave, number of aves that make the
crown of our Lady 76 n. 1.
Aughton, Nic. 216 1. 44.

Auncell, Haukyn treas. of Cam-
bridge 145 l. 23.
Aydon 225 1. 2.

Babraham (Badburham) 93 1. 28,
166 1. 37, 171 1. 35, 256 1. 27.
Bainbridge, Chri. abp. of York 215
1. 8.

Baker, Thos. 123 1. 17 and n. 3,
249 1. 16.
Balsham, Hugh, bp. of Ely, gives
Horningsey vicarage to St John's
hospital 175 1. 22, 177 1. 39.
Balsham, Jo. archd. of Ely 175 1.

28.

Banks, Wm., of Qu. coll. 258 1. 11.
Barbour, Tho. 249 1. 40.
Barbour, Wm. coroner 145 1. 21.
Barker, Jo. chapl., benefactor to
Ospringe 163 1. 4.

Barletott, Rob. 165 1. 36.
Barnard, Rob. clk. 223 l. 25; Bar-
narde, Rob., master of Fotherin-
gay coll. 193 l. 24.

Barnstaple 35 1. 20; gild of tanners
and shoemakers founded by lady
Margaret in that church 221 I.
33.

Barnwell conventual church 175 1.
16; Barnwell, prior of, commis-
sary of the pope, in the litigation
between St John's hospital and
Reginald of Lynne, touching
Horningsey vicarage (1278-9)
174-8.

Barra, Rob. decr. bac. preb. Soth-
well 145 1. 14.
Barrington 104 l. 14.

Barrow, Tho., archd. of Colchester,
his anniversary in St Mary's
Cambridge 55 1. 14.
Bartholomew's, St, lady Margaret's
bequest to 117 1. 16; prior of,
see Bolton.

Bassingbourn 931. 28; Bassingbourne

129 1. 20; Bassyngborne 35 1. 33.
Batmanson, Dr 208 1. 29, 226 1.

22.

Baxster, Rowl. 207 1. 8, 208 l. 21,
209 1. 6, 260 1. 38.
Beach manor 104 12.
Beaconsale, Mr 227 1. 8. See Be-
kynsal.

Beauchamp family of Bletsoe 1 1.
14; lord B. of Powyke 3 n. 1.
Beauchamp, Sir Jo. of Bletsoe,
grandfather of lady Margaret 2
I. 30; ob. 1412 3 1. 4.
Beauchamp, Jo., uncle of lady Mar-
garet 3 1. 3.

Beauchamp, Margaret, d. of Sir Jo.

B. 2 1. 29; succeeds to the family
estates 3 1. 4; marries 1) Sir Ol. St
John of Lydiard Tregoze 3 1. 6;
2) after his death (in 1438) Jo.
Beaufort 1st duke of Somerset,
by whom she had one only child
the lady Margaret 1. 10; her
dower 1. 22; marries 3) Lionel
lord Welles cir. 1447, who is
slain 1461, leaving one son John,
afterwards first visc. Welles 6
1. 9; admitted into fraternity at
Croyland abbey 1464 15 1. 3;
dies cir. 1482 17 1. 27; buried at
Wimborne minster, where her
dau, raises a tomb to her 18 1.
I, 59 1. 13; prayers for her soul
1. 15-23; to be prayed for at
Christ's college 103 1. 2, 106 1.
16; the Margaret preacher to
pray for her soul 94 1. 6.
Beauchamp, Roger de, baron of
Bletsoe summoned to parliament

1363-79 3 n. 1 and 2.
Beauchamp, Roger, grandson to the
above 3 n. 2.

Beaufort, name given to John of
Gaunt's children by Cath. Swin-
ford, from a castle of the name in
France 2 1. 22.

Beaufort, Edm., earl and duke of
Somerset, uncle of lady Margaret
3 l. 20.

Beaufort, Henry card. 51 1. 6; great
uncle of lady Margaret 1. 10.
Beaufort, Jo. e. of, grandfather of
lady Margaret 2 n. 5, 13, 19.
Beaufort, John, first d. of Somerset,
K. G. father of lady Margaret and
grandson of John of Gaunt 2 1.
14, 7 l. 33, 8 l. 5, 13, 19, 126 1.
11; married Margaret Beauchamp
3 1. 10; died 27 May 1444 l. 13,
1. 16, probably by his own hand
3 n. 5; buried at Wimborne 18 1.
I, 59 1. 12; his daughter endows
priests to pray for his soul there
and at Windsor 59 1. 15-23;
to be prayed for at Christ's college
103 1. 1, 106 1. 15; lady Mar-
garet's preacher to pray for his
soul 94 1. 5.

4

Beaufort, Margaret, born at Bletsoe
Beds. 1 1. 13; on the 31 May 2 1.
9 and n. 2; 1441 1. 2 and 13,
rather than 1443 1. 9; her father
John Beaufort first duke of Som-
erset 1. 14; her mother Margaret
Beauchamp 1. 29; her grand-
mother Marg. Holland 381. 25; on
her father's death 27 May 1444 in-
herits part of his estates 3 1. 22, 7
1. 33, 81. 5; ward of Wm. de la
Pole earl of Suffolk 31 May 1444
4, 5; her knowledge of French 5
1.11; of enough Latin to understand
the rubric 1. 17; skill in needlework
1. 19 and n. 3; her abilities, me-
mory, readiness, diligence 61. 3;
her large library Engl. and Fr. 1.
7; her suitors John de la Pole
and Edmund earl of Richmond
6, 7; St Nicolas bid her take Ed-
mund to her husband, when she
was nine years old 7 1. 1 and 15;
is married to John de la Pole 7 1.
21, 8 1. 1; the marriage is re-
garded as a nullity, and the king
gives her in ward to his uterine
brothers Edmund and Jasper Tu-
dor 8 1. 17; marries Edmund
Tudor 8 1. 22, earl of Richmond
1. 29, who dies on the morrow of
all souls 1456 91. 25; in 1455 the
earl and countess petition in fa-
vour of Kirkstall abbey 9 1. 7;
lives at Pembroke castle with her

« AnteriorContinuar »