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TRÜBNER'S ORIENTAL SERIES.

MESSRS. TRÜBNER & CO. beg to call attention to their ORIENTAL SERIES, in which will be collected, as far as possible, all extant information and research upon the History, Religions, Languages, Literature, &c., of Ancient India, China, and the East in general.

The ORIENTAL SERIES will be on a comprehensive design, and no labour or expense will be spared to render the undertaking worthy of its subject. Messrs. TRÜBNER & Co. have already secured the services of eminent Eastern students and writers; and while the labour proposed must necessarily prove vast, they intend to accomplish it by working with many able hands over the whole field, under careful and well-organised Editorship.

THE FOLLOWING WORKS ARE NOW READY:— Second Edition, post 8vo, cloth, pp. xvi.-427, price 16s. ESSAYS ON THE SACRED LANGUAGE, WRITINGS, AND RELIGION OF THE PARSIS.

BY MARTIN HAUG, PH.D.,

Late of the Universities of Tübingen, Göttingen, and Bonn; Superintendent of Sanskrit Studies, and Professor of Sanskrit in the Poona College; Honorary Member of the Bombay Branch Royal Asiatic Society, &c.

EDITED BY DR. E. W. WEST.

I. History of the Researches into the Sacred Writings and Religion of the Parsis, from the Earliest Times down to the Present.

II. Languages of the Parsi Scriptures.

III. The Zend-Avesta, or the Scripture of the Parsis.

IV. The Zoroastrian Religion, as to its Origin and Development.

The Author of these Essays intended, after his return from India, to expand them into a comprehensive work on the Zoroastrian religion; but this design, postponed from time to time, was finally frustrated by his untimely death. That he was not spared to publish all his varied know. ledge on this subject must remain for ever a matter of regret to the student of Iranian antiquities. In other hands, the changes that could be introduced into this Second Edition were obviously limited to such additions and alterations as the lapse of time and the progress of Zoroastrian studies have rendered necessary.

In the First Essay, the history of the European researches has been extended to the present time; but for the sake of brevity several writings have been passed over unnoticed, among the more valuable of which those of Professor Hübschmann may be specially mentioned. Some account has also been given of the progress of Zoroastrian studies among the Parsis themselves.

In the Second Essay, additional information has been given about the Pahlavi language and literature; but the technical portion of the Avesta Grammar has been reserved for separate publication, being better adapted for students than for the general reader.

Some additions have been made to the Third Essay, with the view of bringing together, from other sources, all the author's translations from the Avesta, except those portions of the Gâthas which he did not include in the First Edition, and which it would be hazardous for an Editor to revise. Further details have also been given regarding the contents of the Nasks.

Several additional translations having been found among the author's papers, too late for insertion in the Third Essay, have been added in an Appendix, after careful revision, together with his notes descriptive of the mode of performing a few of the Zoroastrian ceremonies.

The Author's principal object in publishing these Essays originally, was to present in a readable form all the materials for judging impartially of the - scriptures and religion of the Parsis. The same object has been kept in view while preparing this Second Edition, giving a large quantity of such materials, collected from a variety of sources, which may now be left to the reader's impartial judgment.

The value of this Second Edition is greatly enhanced by the addition of many posthumous papers, discovered by the Editor, Dr. E. West, at Munich. They consist of further translations from the Zend and Pahlavi of the ZendAvesta, and also of numerous detailed notes descriptive of some of the Parsi ceremonies.

Post 8vo, cloth, pp. viii.--176, price 7s. 6d.

TEXTS FROM THE BUDDHIST CANON

COMMONLY KNOWN AS "DHAMMAPADA.”

With Accompanying Narratives.

Translated from the Chinese by S. BEAL, B.A., Professor of Chinese, University College, London.

Among the great body of books comprising the Chinese Buddhist Canon, presented by the Japanese Government to the Library of the India Office, Mr. Beal discovered a work bearing the title of "Law Verses, or Scriptural Texts," which on examination was seen to resemble the Pali version of Dhammapada in many particulars. It was further discovered that the original recension of the Pali Text found its way into China in the Third Century (A.D.), where the work of translation was finished, and afterwards thirteen additional sections added. The Dhammapada, as hitherto known by the Pali Text Edition, as edited by Fausböll, by Max Müller's English, and Albrecht Weber's German translations, consists only of twenty-six chapters or sections, whilst the Chinese version, or rather recension, as now translated by Mr. Beal, consists of thirty-nine sections. The students of Pali who possess Fausböll's Text, or either of the above-named translations, will therefore needs want Mr. Beal's English rendering of the Chinese version; the thirteen above-named additional sections not being accessible to them in any other form; for, even if they understand Chinese, the Chinese original would be unobtainable by them.

"Mr. Beal, by making it accessible in an English dress, has added to the great services he has already rendered to the comparative study of religious history."Academy.

"Valuable as exhibiting the doctrine of the Buddhists in its purest, least adulterated, form, it brings the modern reader face to face with that simple creed and rule of conduct which won its way over the minds of myriads, and which is now nominally professed by 145 millions, who have overlaid its austere simplicity with innumerable ceremonies, forgotten its maxims, perverted its teaching, and so inverted its leading principle that a religion whose founder denied a God, now worships that founder as a god himself."-Scotsman.

Post 8vo, cloth, pp. xxiii.—360, price 188.

THE HISTORY OF INDIAN LITERATURE.

BY ALBRECHT WEBER.

Translated from the Second German Edition by JOHN MANN, M. A., and THÉODOR ZACHARIAE, Ph.D., with the sanction of the Author.

Dr. BUHLER, Inspector of Schools in India, writes:-"I am extremely glad to learn that you are about to publish an English translation of Professor A. Weber's 'History of Indian Literature.' When I was Professor of Oriental Languages in Elphinstone College, I frequently felt the want of such a work to which I could refer the students. I trust that the work which you are now publishing will become a class-book in all the Indian colleges, as it is the first and only scientific one which deals with the whole field of Vedic, Sanskrit, and Prakrit literature."

C

Professor COWELL, of Cambridge, writes :- "The English translation of Professor A. Weber's History of Indian Literature' will be of the greatest use to those who wish to take a comprehensive survey of all that the Hindoo mind has achieved. It will be especially useful to the students in our Indian colleges and universities. I used to long for such a book when I was teaching in Calcutta. Hindu students are intensely interested in the history of Sanskrit literature, and this volume will supply them with all they want on the subject. I hope it will be made a text-book wherever Sanskrit and English are taught."

Professor WHITNEY, Yale College, Newhaven, Conn., U.S.A., writes:"I am the more interested in your enterprise of the publication of Weber's Sanskrit Literature in an English version, as I was one of the class to whom the work was originally given in the form of academic lectures. At their first appearance they were by far the most learned and able treatment of their subject; and with their recent additions they still maintain decidedly the same rank. Wherever the language, and institutions, and history of India are studied, they must be used and referred to as authority."

Post 8vo, cloth, pp. xii.—198, accompanied by Two Language
Maps, price 128.

A SKETCH OF

THE MODERN LANGUAGES OF THE EAST INDIES.

BY ROBERT N. CUST.

The Author has attempted to fill up a vacuum, the inconvenience of which pressed itself on his notice. Much had been written about the languages of the East Indies, but the extent of our present knowledge had not even been brought to a focus. Information on particular subjects was only to be obtained or looked for by consulting a specialist, and then hunting down the numbers of a serial or the chapters of a volume not always to be found. It occurred to him that it might be of use to others to publish in an arranged form the notes which he had collected for his own edification. Thus the work has grown upon him.

"The book before us is then a valuable contribution to philological science. It passes under review a vast number of languages, and it gives, or professes to give, in every case the sum and substance of the opinions and judgments of the best-informed writers."-Saturday Review.

Second Corrected Edition, post 8vo, pp. xii.-116, cloth, price 5s.

THE BIRTH OF THE WAR-GOD.

A Poem. BY KALIDASA.

Translated from the Sanskrit into English Verse by
RALPH T. H. GRIFFITH, M.A.

"Mr. Griffith's very spirited rendering of the Kumárasambhava, first published twenty-six years ago, is well known to most who are at all interested in Indian literature, or enjoy the tenderness of feeling and rich creative imagination of its author."-Indian Antiquary.

"We are very glad to welcome a second edition of Professor Griffith's admirable translation of the well-known Sanskrit poem, the Kumárasambhava. Few translations deserve a second edition better."-Athenæum.

Post 8vo, cloth, pp. 432, price 16s.

A CLASSICAL DICTIONARY OF HINDU MYTHOLOGY AND RELIGION, GEOGRAPHY, HISTORY, AND

LITERATURE.

BY JOHN DOWSON, M.R. A. S.,

Late Professor of Hindustani, Staff College.

In this work an endeavour has been made to supply the long-felt want of a Hindu Classical Dictionary. The late Professor Wilson projected such a work, and forty years ago announced his intention of preparing it for the Oriental Translation Fund, but he never accomplished his design. The main portion of this work consists of mythology, but religion is bound up with mythology, and in many points the two are quite inseparable. Of history, in the true sense, Sanskrit possesses nothing, or next to nothing, but what little has been discovered here finds its place. The chief geographical names of the old writers also have received notice, and their localities and identifications are described so far as present knowledge extends. Lastly, short descriptions have been given of the most frequently mentioned Sanskrit books, but only of such books as are likely to be found named in the works of English writers.

This work will be a book of reference for all concerned in the government of the Hindus, but it will be more especially useful to young Civil Servants and to masters and students in the universities, colleges, and schools in India.

"It is no slight gain when such subjects are treated fairly and fully in a moderate space; and we need only add that the few wants which we may hope to see supplied in new editions detract but little from the general excellence of Mr. Dowson's work." -Saturday Review.

Post 8vo, with View of Mecca, pp. cxii.-172, cloth, price 98.

SELECTIONS FROM THE KORAN.

BY EDWARD WILLIAM LANE,

Hon. Doctor of Literature, Leyden; Correspondent of the Institute of France; Hon. Member of the German Oriental Society, the Royal Asiatic Society, &c.; Translator of "The Thousand and One Nights; " Author of an "Arabic-English Lexicon," &c.

A New Edition, Revised and Enlarged, with an Introduction by

STANLEY LANE POOLE.

EXTRACT FROM PREFACE.

There has always been a wish to know something about the sacred book of the Mohammadans, and it was with the design of satisfying this wish, whilst avoiding the weariness and the disgust which a complete perusal of the Koran must produce, that Mr. Lane arranged the "Selections" which

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were published in 1843. It has proved of considerable service to students of Arabic, who have found it the most accurate rendering in existence of a large part of the Koran; and even native Muslims of India, ignorant of Arabic, have used Lane's "Selections" as their Bible.

"Mr. Poole is both a generous and a learned biographer. . . . Mr. Poole tells us the facts... so far as it is possible for industry and criticism to ascertain them, and for literary skill to present them in a condensed and readable form."—Englishman, Calcutta.

Post 8vo, pp. xliv.-376, cloth, price 148.

METRICAL TRANSLATIONS FROM SANSKRIT

WRITERS.

With an Introduction, many Prose Versions, and Parallel Passages from Classical Authors.

BY J. MUIR, C.I.E., D.C.L., LL.D., Ph.D.

The present embraces the contents of the little work entitled "Religious and Moral Sentiments, metrically rendered from Sanskrit Writers," &c., published by Messrs. WILLIAMS & NORGATE in 1875, together with Three collections of Versified Translations subsequently printed, but not published, and a reprint of the metrical pieces contained in Volumes II. and V. of the author's "Original Sanskrit Texts," &c.

"A volume which may be taken as a fair illustration alike of the religious and moral sentiments, and of the legendary lore of the best Sanskrit writers."— Edinburgh Daily Review.

Post 8vo, pp. vi.-368, cloth, price 148.

MODERN INDIA AND THE INDIANS,

BEING A SERIES OF IMPRESSIONS, NOTES, AND ESSAYS.

BY MONIER WILLIAMS, D.C.L.,

Hon. LL.D. of the University of Calcutta, Hon. Member of the Bombay Asiatic Society, Boden Professor of Sanskrit in the University of Oxford.

Third Edition, revised and augmented by considerable Additions,
with Illustrations and a Map.

This edition will be found a great improvement on those that preceded it. The author has taken care to avail himself of all such criticisms on particular passages in the previous editions as appeared to him to be just, and he has enlarged the work by more than a hundred pages of additional matter. The chapter on the "Villages and Rural Population of India," and several other sections of the work, are quite new.

"In this volume we have the thoughtful impressions of a thoughtful man on some of the most important questions connected with our Indian Empire. An enlightened observant man, travelling among an enlightened observant people, Professor Monier Williams has brought before the public in a pleasant form more of the manners and customs of the Queen's Indian subjects than we ever remember to have seen in any one work. He not only deserves the thanks of every Englishman for this able contribution to the study of Modern India-a subject with which we should be specially familiar-but he deserves the thanks of every Indian, Parsee or Hindu, Buddhist and Moslem, for his clear exposition of their manners, their creeds, and their necessities."-Times.

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