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so crosseth the Highway below the said Chappell ; and so runneth mearing down a Hedge, by a Meadow called the Plorin untill that ye come to the river of Rumney; and from thence it is meared by the said River Rumney untill it come to a Moore called Griffiths' Moore, being the Lands of Thomas Morgan of Llanrumney, Esq., now in the tenure of John William and others, on the one side; and from thence it meareth south ward with a Ditch that severeth between the said Griffith's moore and other Lands of the Countess Dowager of Pembroke, now in the tenure of Will’m Richards, of the one side, and the lands of the said Thomas Morgan of Llan Rumney, Esq., called Lloyne y Grant Kenol, on the other side, now in the tenure of John William af’sd and others, untill it cometh to a Corn Grist Mill called Roath mill, which said Mill the said Jurors do hereby likewise present to be the Lords Mill, and situate within this Lordship, and from the said Mill to Roath Bridge, being made of stone, near the Church, about a Cottage and waste Ground thereunto belonging, called Goose Lear, now in the tenure of Edwd. Thomas, and being part of this Lordship, unto the meeting of the two Brooks eastward, untill it comes to another Bridge called Pont evan Quint. Alsoe it is meared westward with a Brook called Nantmawr, and from Pont Evan Quint unto

a a Lane called Hewl y Keven-coyd westward, and thence along that Lane to the Place called Rhybillwhe before mentioned.

“ Item the said Jurors do hereby present and say that one Tenement of the Lord's Land called Weddall ycha, being parcell of this Lordship, is situate in the parish of Landaffe, and now held by Lease from the said Lord of this Manor by Wm. Jones of Cardiff, and is now in the tenure of Morgan Robert his underten't, and that it doth meare and bound into a Lane called Hewly coyd on the east, the Mountain or Common called Mynyth bychan on the north and west, and the lands of Sr Chas. Kemeys, Bart., called Weddall issa, now in the tenure of William Morris, and a place called Kinthe bach on the south part thereof.

“ Item we say and present that one other Tenement of the said Lord of this Mannor, now in the tenure of Alice William, widow, being parcel of this Lo’pp, is situate in the parish of Whichurch, meering and bounding to the Common called Mynyth bychan, and a Highway leading from a place called Pantbach to a place called Rhyd y watley on the east, and a tump or bank or earth on the Common, called Wayntreoda, which tump or bank adjoineth to the several Lordships of Landaffe, Llistalybont, Senhenith, and to this Lo’pp on the west part thereof; the lands of the widow Mathews of Cabalva being part of the Lordship of Llistalybont on the south, and the lands of Captn.

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Richard Jenkins, being part of the Lo'pp of Senhenith, now in the tenure of Wm. Thomas and Henry Morgan,on the north part thereof.

" Item we say and present that one other Tenement of the lands of the Lord of this Manor, situate in the parish of Whichurch afsd, now in the tenure of Lewis Lewis, being alsoe parcel of this Lordship, and late the land of one Samuel Edwards, doth bound and mear to the said Common, Mynith bychan, the s'd place called Pantbach on the south, and the s'd way leading to Rhyd y Watley on the west, and the lands of the s'd Lord of this manor, now in the tenure of Thos. Morgan, being in the Lo'pp of Senhenith, on the north part thereof. And from thence the s'd Lo’pp is bounded with the mears that meareth between the parish of Lanishen and Whichurch untill it cometh to a Brooke called Cassen, in a place where the s'd Brooke runneth between a place called Kae y cunrick, parcel of the Lo'pp of Senhenith, and the lands of Rich'd Lewis of Cansham (Corsham), Esq., now in the tenure of Thos. William, being parcel of this Lo'pp of Roath-Kensam; and from thence to the ruins of an Old Castle near draynew Pen y graig, it is meared by the Brook called Kastan, and on a Hill called Graig Kibber on the north, and Lands of S'r Chas. Kemeys, Bart., now in the tenure of Rees John Mathew, and the brook that runneth between the lands of the s'd Richard Lewis, Esq., called Tir y whit, and one other Tenement of the s'd Richard Lewis, Esq., now in the tenure of Wm. David Lewis, untill it cometh to the stone Bridge on the Highway, by Llanisthen Church. And from thence, by Rhyd y mincoch, to a place called Gwain y pentra, hard by the Common called Munith bychan, it is meared by the Highway southward; and from thence, hereinbefore mentioned, to the lands of Lewis Lewis, as aforesaid, it is meared on the south part thereof with a mount or wake there raised, and now extant.

Item we say and present that one other Tenement of the Lord of this Manor, situate in the parish of Roath af’sd, called by the name of Courtbach, now in the tenure of Joseph Meredith, is mearing and bounding unto the Higlıway leading from Roath Village unto Roath Bridge, the Brook that cometh from Roath mill, the customary Land of the Lord of this Mannor, now in the tenure of Joseph Meredith ; the lands of George Howells, Esq., now in his own tenure, on all parts and sides thereof, and it is part of the said Lordship.

“ Item we present and say that one other Tenement of Land of the Lord of this Mannor is situate in the said Parish of Roath, and called by the name of Pengam, now in the tenure of Edmond Meredith, meared and bounded with the River Rumney, the lands of Robert Harvey, Esq., and George Howells, Esq. ; and on the southwest with the lands of the Lord of the Friars, and a mead called Gwain y maillocke, in the tenure of Wm. Harry; the Lands of Sir Humphrey Mackworth, called Saith erw deon, now in the Tenure of the said Sir Humphrey, and being parcel of this Lordship.

"Item we say and present that there are two other parcels of the Lord's Lands, being likewise part of this Lordship, situate in Roath moore, and now in the Tenure of the said Edmond Meredith, as lands belonging to the aforementioned tenement called Pengam, whereof one is called by the name of the Back, al's Abbotsland, contain'g by estimation 8 acres or thereabouts; and the other is called Pedair erw Twch, cont’g by estimation four acres or thereabouts.

“ Item we say and present that the land called Saith erw deon, being the lands of the said Sir Humphrey Mackworth, and now in his own Tenure, doth join with the Land of the Lord of this Mannor, and now in the tenure of the aforenamed Edinond Meredith as part of Pengam ffarın, and is parcell of this Lordship, and contains by estimation Seven Acres or thereabouts.”

SEPULCHRAL RECUMBENT EFFIGY IN BETTWS Y COED CHURCH,

NORTH WALES. Those of the sepulchral effigies in Wales, of the fourteenth century, represented in armour, will ofttimes be found to differ in detail from those of the same period in England. I am not, however, about to enter into a general comparison, but shall content myself with observing upon a single effigy only, that represented in the annexed engraving, one of a most interesting description, preserved in the little church of Bettws y

, Coed, not far from Llanrwst, a spot well known to tourists of North Wales. In the north wall of the chancel of this little church is a plain, pointed, sepulchral arch, the quarter-round mouldings of which clearly indicate it to be of, or about, the middle of the fourteenth century.

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Beneath this arch is deposited a recumbent effigy of a warrior clad in the defensive armour of the fourteenth century, of a rare description ; peculiar, I think, or nearly so, to Wales. The head of this effigy reposes, in a not unusual manner, on a tilting-helm of the description worn in tournaments; the crest on which, of a large size, is that of a bird's head and beak. On the head of this effigy appears the basinet or war-helmet, the top of which has been broken. On either side of the basinet is a leaf of four foils. Attached by cordons within loops on either side of the lower border of the basinet, is a camail, or tippet of mail, of that kind often described as of rings set edgewise; the links of which are very perfect, and five-eighths of an inch in diameter. The camail covers the chin and breast, and over the upper lip is worn the moustache. The shoulders are protected by epaulières of overlapping plates, and gussets of mail cover the armpits. In front of the shoulders are roundels of plate, 3} inches in diameter, each bearing a cinquefoiled rosette. Likeshaped roundels appear also at the bending of the elbows. The upper arms, from the shoulders to the elbows, are enclosed within defensive plates of armour called brassarts or rerebraces; the elbows are protected by coudes,-armour so called; the lower arms are encased within vambraces. Both the rere and vambraces are studded with button-like protuberances, threeeighths to half an inch in diameter, four rows of which are apparent on the rerebraces. Gauntlets of plate, with articulated finger-joints, protect the hands, which are conjoined on the breast as in prayer; and between which a heart is held,--a by no means unusual representation. Over the breastplate the short and sleeveless, close-fitting surcoat called the jupon is worn. This is heraldically emblazoned with a chevron and two oak-leaves in chief; and the skirts of the jupon are bordered by a row of oak-leaves. Round the loins, and encircling the jupon horizontally, appears the bawdrick, an ornamental belt of some width. In front of the

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