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§ 19. Exchange with Belfast favourable to Ireland, while that with

Dublin adverse .

12

20. Difference of 12 per cent. between Exchange with Dublin and

with Belfast

13

21. The fact proved that a balance of payments was due to Ire-

land, while the Exchange was so depressed

13

22. First declaration of the opinion that gold had risen, and paper

had not fallen

14

23. Opinion of Mr. Marshall that Irish Bank notes were depre-

ciated

15

24. His evidence on the subject

16

25. The Theory of the Directors of the Bank of Ireland as to the

regulation of the paper currency

16

26. Report of the Committee

17

27. The Committee report that the Directors should regulate

their issues by the price of guineas and the foreign Ex-

changes

18

28. Very debased state of the coinage

19

29. The Committee do not discuss the new theory of paper

currency

19

30. They recommend an assimilation of the English and Irish

currencies

20

31.' Mr. Fox declares it to be a fantastical opinion that paper was

not depreciated, and that gold had risen

20

32.' First declaration by a Parliamentary Committee that the

paper currency should be regulated by the Foreign

Exchanges,

21

33. Renewal of the Bank's loan to Government

21

34. Circumstances which lead to the great depreciation of the

British Currency

21

35. Perfidious conduct of Prussia in 1805

22

36. The Berlin decree against British commerce in 1807

23

37. Immense speculation in 1808, and subsequent years

24

38. Great multiplication of country banks in 1809

25

39. Great rise in the market price of gold

25

40. Appointment of the Bullion COMMITTEE

25

41. Report of 1810 identical in principle with that of 1804 26

42. Names of the Committee

26

43. Identity in sentiment between the witnesses examined before

both Committees

27

44. Remarks upon some of the evidence

27

45. State of facts agreed upon

28

46. Issues maintained by one party

28

47. Issues maintained by the other party

29

48. Discussion of the points of difference

30

49. Evidence of Mr. Chambers

31

50. Remark of Mr. Huskisson

33

51. Fallacy of Mr. Chambers's opinions

33

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PAGE

$ 52. Another illustration

. 34

53. One argument to shew that there was no difference in value

between guineas and Bank notes

34

54. Discussion on second point of difference between the two

parties

35

55. Opinion of a foreign merchant

36

56. Discussion of the third point of difference between the parties 37

57. Discussion of the fourth point of difference reserved

38

58. ANALYSIS OF THE BULLION REPORT

38

59. The same continued

38

60. The same continued

61. The same continued

39

62. The same continued

40

63. The same continued

64. The same continued

40

65. The same continued

41

66. The same continued

41

67. The same continued

42

68. The same continued

42

69. The same continued

43

70. The same continued

43

71. The same continued

43

72. The same continued

44

73. The same continued

44

74. The same continued

44

75. The same continued

45

76. The same continued

45

77. The same continued

45

78. The same continued

46

79. The same continued

80. The Bullion Report is the standard by which all legislation

regarding the paper currency should be regulated

46

81. . Resolutions of Mr. Horner

47

82. Mr. Rose's reply to Mr. Horner

47

83. Speech of Mr. Thornton

48

84. Mr. Vansittart's resolutions

49

85. Historical untruth of the doctrine that the coinage never was

intended to contain any fixed quantity of bullion

50

86. Prevalence of a paper price and a cash price for goods

51

87. Examples of this given by Mr. Sharp

51

88. Instances given by Sir Francis Burdett .

52

89. Theory of the opponents of the Bullion Report

52

90. Rejection of the Bullion Report-Mr. Peel votes with the

majority

91. Resolutions of Mr. Vansittart

53

92. Mr. Canning tries to persuade Mr. Vansittart to abstain from

pressing his resolution

53

93. Great absurdity of the law regarding the sale of guineas 54

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14. Letter of Lord King

95. Lord Stanhope's Act in 1811

55

96. Opposed by Lord Grenville.

97. Observations of Lord Stanhope

98. Absurdity of these opinions .

57

39. Lord Stanhope's Bill passed .

57

100. Remarks upon overtrading of 1809 reserved .

57

101. Alleged injustice of making the Bank buy gold at the market

price.

57

102. High price of corn in 1812 .

103. Great speculations and increase of country banks in 1813 59

104. Very abundant harvest of 1813, and revulsion of credit in
1815-16

59

105. Great destruction of country bank paper in 1816; rise in the

foreign exchanges, and fall in the market price of gold . 60

106. Which is an example of the truth of the principles of the

Bullion Report

60

107. Partial resumption of cash payments in 1816

108. Restriction prolonged till July, 1818

61

109. Mismanagement of the Bank in 1818

61

110. Great drain of Bullion in 1818-19—appointment of Committee

by both Houses of Parliament to inquire into the ex-

pediency of resuming cash payments

62

111. Names of the Committee

63

112. Great change in the opinions of the mercantile world regard.

ing the principles of the Bullion Report

63

113. Opinion of Mr. Dorrein, Governor of the Bank

64

114. Opinion of Mr. Pole, Deputy-Governor of tne Bank

115. Opinion of Mr. Haldimand, Director of the Bank

65

116. Opinion of Mr. Ward, Director of the Bank

69

117. Opinion of Mr. Samuel Thornton, late Director of the Bank. 70

118. Opinion of Mr. Irving

70

119. Opinion of Mr. Holland

71

120. Opinion of Mr. Thomas Tooke

72

121. Opinion of Mr. Ricardo .

73

122. Opinion of Mr. Baring

75

123. Opinion of Mr. John Ward

77

121. Resolution of the Bank of England in opposition to the evi-

dence of the mercantile witnesses

78

125. Reports of the Committees to both Houses

78

126. Ministeral Resolutions.

79

127. Speech of Lord Liverpool

128. Speeches of Lord Lauderdale and Lord King

81

129. Speech of Lord Grenville

82

130. The speeches of Lords Liverpool and Grenville deserve to be

carefully studied

84

181. Speech of Mr. Peel in the House of Conimons

84

132. Speeches of various members

87

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