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APPENDIX.

LANGUAGES OF THE MALAY ARCHIPELAGO- - Continued.

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625

Uton.

Toon.

..Datus.

INDEX.

A.

Abel, Dr. Clarke, his account of a mias, 74.
Acacia, in the Archipelago, 20.
Acarus, bites of the, 363.
Eschynanthus, climber plants in Borneo, 92.
African negroes, on the crania and languages
of the, 601.

Ahtiago, village of, 365.
Ahtiago and Tobo vocabularies, 606.
Alcedo, Don, 461.

Alfuros, the true indigenes of Gilolo, 321, 323;
of Papuan race, the predominant type in
Ceram, 370.

Ali, the author's attendant boy, 320, 321, 328,
335; the author's head man, 412.
Allen, Charles, the author's assistant, 57; sent
with the collections to Sarawak, 75; finds
employment, and leaves the author for four
years, 211; rejoins the author, 309; news
of, 320, 324, 381, 386, 519; letters received
from, 548; his collections, 549; his difficul-
ties, 549; his wanderings, 551; finally ob-
tains employment in Singapore, 551; his
voyage to Sorong, and his difficulties, 572
Allor vocabulary, 607.
Amahay, bay of, 358; visit to, 363.
Amberbaki, visit to, 507.

Amblau vocabulary, 606.

Amboyna, island of, 16; voyage to, from Ban-
da, 298; map of, 299; the town of, 296;
volcanoes in remote times, 209, 300 (see
Water, limpid); the author's cottage in,
302 (see Interior); general character of the
people, 306; habits and customs, 306 (see
Shells); clove cultivation established at,
316; departure from, 355; map of, 356.
Amboyna lory, 3 52.

Ampanam, 162, 164; birds of, 164; cause of
the tremendous surf at, 172.
Anchors of the Malays, 545, 546.
Andaman Islands, in the Bay of Bengal, 593.
Animal life, luxuriance and beauty of, in the
Moluccas, 406, 407,
Animals, distribution of, the key to facts in
the past history of the earth, 154–159, 210-
218; geographical distribution of, 401, 492.
Anonaceous trees in Borneo, 92.
Anthribidæ, species of, 330.

Ants, noxious, 478; at Dorey, tormented by,
514.

Ape, the Siamang, 143.
Arabs in Singapore, 32.
Archipelago, Malay, physical geography of,
13; productions of, in some cases unknown

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Aru Islands, 18; voyage to, from Macassar in
a native prau, 408 et seq.; diary of the voy.
age, 413 et seq.; arrival at the, 431; ex.
ploration of the forests of, 433; entomo-
logical captures, 433; traders of the, 454;
articles for disposal or exchange, 435; im-
mense variety of animal life, 437 et seq.;
pirates on the coast of, 440, 441; trade and
commerce of, 444; nominally under the
government of the Moluccas, 444; journey
and residence in the interior, 445 et seq.;
map of the, 446; birds of the, 446-452;
habits of the natives, 452, 453; their food,
452; arrack their chief luxury, 453; their
wretched habitations, 453; their mono'o-
nous existence, 453; mixture of races, 454;
their language, 454; men and boys expert
archers, 460; inquisitiveness of the inhab-
itants, 463 et seq.; dry and wet season,
464, 465; beauty of the human form, 467;
females of, 467; personal ornaments, 468;
movable utensils, 459; household ornaments
of the, 469; mats and boxes of, 469; do-
mestic animals, 469; noxious animals, cen-
tipedes, scorpions, etc., 470; legend respect-
ing the, 471; mysterious character of the
author, 473; second residence at Dobbo,
476; cheapness of European articles of
commerce, 478; intemperance of the na-
tives, 479; considerable trade of the, 485;
departure from, 455; the return voyage,
486; the dry and rainy seasons, 483; ex-
pedition to, eminently successful, 486; the
specimens of natural objects brought from,
486; sketch of its physical geography, 487
et seq.; the great island called Tanabusar,
487; number of small islands surrounding
the central mass, 487; evidence that they
once formed a part of New Guinea, 492;
its natural aspects and vegetable produc
tions, 492 et & q.
Aru Islands vocabulary, 607.

Aurora borealis observed at Muka, 530,
Australia, resemblance to, of the Austro-Ma-
layan division of the Archipelago, 25; great
difference between the productions of, and
those of Asia, 25.
Australians, on the crania and languages of
the, 601, 602.
Austro-Malayan division of the Archipelago,
21 (see also Indo-Malayan); its close resem-
blance to Australia, not to Asia, 25.
Awaiya, village of, 358; arrival at, 363.
Awaiya vocabulary, 606.
Ayer-panas, life at, 40.

B.

Babirúsa (pig-deer), the, 270, 282; skull of the,
283, 395; of Celebes found in Bouru, 397.
Baboon monkeys at Batchian, 344; of the
Moluccas, 396.

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Baderoon, the author's servant, 412; his gam-
bling propensities, 483.

Bali, island of, 16; no forest in, 20; difference
between, and Lombock, 25 (see Birds in);
position of, and of Lombock, 160; the only
islands of the Archipelago in which the
Hindoo religion maintains itself, 160 (see |
Bileling); beauty of the district around,
161; cattle and birds, 161, .62; birds in,
162.

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Batchian, island of, 16; voy ge to, 325; vol-
canoes of, 327; arrival at, 332; difficulties
of obtaining accommodation, 333; the au-
thor's cottage in the suburbs, 333, 334;
interview with the Sultan, 334; road to the
coal-mines, 335; virgin forest of, 335; dis-
tinct races of, 337; robbery at, 338; wet |
season at, 339; music and dancing at, 340;
dome-tic habits of, 340: eatable bats at,341:
walk in the forest of, 341; objects of natu-
ral history at, 342 et seq.: its great variety
of surface and of soil, 349; sketch map of,

541

Bitchian vocabulary, 606.
Batrachostomus crinifrons, 352.
Bats, eatable, 341.

Batu-merah vocabulary, 606.
Batuassa, village of, 365.

Beard, cultivating a, 478.

Beck, Capt. Van der, 355, 357; his e-traordi-
nary knowledge of languages, 357.
Bee-eater, Australian, 167, 280
Bee-hunters and bee-hunting. 207–209.
Bees-wax in Timor, 207.

Beetles, 700 species collected in Singapore,
56; distinct (130) kinds of the Longicorns,
56; proper ground for collecting, 47; large

number and new species of, collected at
the Simunjon coal-works, 48, 300; a rare
beetle, 309; numerous -p cies of, discover-
ed, 329, 330, 337; capture of, 543; found at
Bouru, 392; of the Moluccas, 406; the va-
rious species, 496; obtained for tobacco,
427; numerous species in New Guinea, 513;
new species, 513.

Belang vocabulary, 605.
Belideus ariel, 344, 398.

Bengalese in Singapore, 32.
Bernstein, Dr., 3-4; collector for the Leyden
Museum, 344.

Bessir, village of, 526, 534; visit to, 534;
wretched accommodation there, 534, 535;
bargain with the men for catching Birds of
Paradise, 535, 536; their method of snaring
them, 537; scarcity of food there, 538; the
country around very hilly and rugged, 53.
Bileling, arrival at, from Singapore, 160; a
Chinese house in, 160.

Bird of Paradise, new form of, 336; named
Wallace's Standard Wing," 336.
Birds, in Bali and Lombock, 25; in Malacca,
39, 40; in Bali, 162; in Ampanam, 164;
boys' bird-catching, 164; beautiful birds,
167, 168 (see Simla group, and Celebes),
268 (see Maleo); scarcity of, 34; insular
forms of, 351; collections of, in Bouru,
395; number of species from the Molucca
group of islands, 399, 400; number of, in
Europe compared, 400; in India, 400; va-
rious noi es of, 449: numerous varieties of,
in the Aru Islands, 460 et seq.; dancing-
parties of, called "Sacaleli," 466; those
which live only in the depths of the for-
est, 490; shot at Dorey, 502; collection of,
obtained in Waigiou, 539; of New Guinea,
577; genera and species of, 578.
Birds of Paradise, 13; range of, 27; their great
beauty, 467; specimens of, obtained in the ir
native forests, 486; at Waigiou, 53; diffi-
culty of catching them, 529, 530; descrip-
tion of, 530; bargains with the bird-catchers
of Bessir for capturing them, 535; their
success, 536; some of them kept in cages,
but they did not live, 537; method of snar-
ing them, 537; their history and habits,
552 et seq.; different names applied to, by
different nations, 552; their structure and
affinities, 553; the Great Bird of Paradise
(the Paradises apoda of Linnæus), the
largest species known, 553; changes of
plumage, 554; native method of catching
them, 555; mode of pre-erving them, 555;
the Leger Bird of Paradise (Paradisea pa-
puana), 556; the true Paradise birds, 557;
fed on cockroaches, 557; Paradisea rubra,
558; changes of plumage, 559; King Bird
(Paradisea regia), its great beauty, 560;
the Magnificent" (Paradisea speciosa),
561; the Diphillodes wilsoni, 563; the Su-
perb Bird, 563; the Golden or Six-shafted
bird (Parotia sexpennis), 564; the Stand-
ard Wing, 565: the Epimachide, or Long-
billed birds, 567; Twelve-wired bird (Par-
adisea alba), 567; Seleucides alba, 568; the
great Epimaque, or Long-tailed bird, 569;
Scale-breasted bird, 59; Ptiloris alberti,
P. Paradiseus, P. Victoriæ, 570; Paradise
Oriole (Paradisea aurea), 571; list of all
the Birds of Paradise yet known, with the

INDEX.

places they are believed to inhabit, 572; the
countries they chiefly inhabit, 572; an ar-
ticle of commerce, 573; Mr. Allen's voyage
to Sorong, in New Guinea, in quest of, 573
e. seq.; termination of the search for these
beautiful birds, 575; difficulties of the un-
dertaking, 575.

Bird-winged butterflies, 342, 434; their beau-
ty and brilliancy, 342; of the Moluccas, 405.
Boat-building under difficulties, 377; of the
Ké Islands, 425, 426.

Boats, difficulty in obtaining, 366, 367; de-
scription of, 367.

Borneo, large enough for the whole of Great
Britain to be set down in the centre of, and
hidden, 15; the centre of the great curve of
volcanoes, 19; a forest country, 19, 27; ar-
rival at, 46 (see Sarawak); the orang-utan
an inhabitant of, and of Sumatra, 68;
journey in the interior, 75 (see Dyak);
pheasants in, 117.
Borotoi, a Malay village, 78; assembling to
look at the author, 79; appearance of the
people, 79; assembling to see the author
eat, 79; amusing the children, 79; depar-
ture from to Budw (which se.).
Botanical locality, 349.
Bouru Island, map of, 356; visit to, 387; dif-
ficulties of the journey, 359; beetle found|
at, 392; ignorant simplicity of the natives,
393; of two distinct races, 394; collections
in, 395; mountains of, 417; two distinct
races there, 590.
Bouton vocabulary, 605.
Boutong, island of, 414.
Boutyne mountain, 413,
Brambanam, an ancient village of Java, 115.
Bow and Bedé, Chinese gold-fields in Borneo,

43.

Bread-fruit, the tree, 203, 310; excellency of,
310.

Brenthidæ, 343; abundant in Aru, 482; their
pugnacity, 482.
Brick-work, excellent, in an ancient city in
Java, 111.

Brissi vocabulary, 607.

Britain, New, 16.

Brooke, Sir James, at Sarawak, 46; butterfly
named after, 48; his account of a mias, 73;
the author a guest of, 94; character of his
government, 102-104; his suppression of
piracy, 347.

Brush-turkeys, 25.

Budw, Malay village, 80; reception by the
natives, native dances, 89; proceed to Se-
nánkan (which see).

Bugis sailors, their peaceful character, 444;
traders in the far East, 380, 351.
Bugis vocabulary, 605.
Buitenzorg, near Batavia, botanical gardens
of, 121 climate, etc., 121; village culture
near, 122.
Bukit-tima, residence at, 34; character of the
Jesuit host there, 35; mission-house, 35.
Buprestidæ, of different species, 329, 350, 343.
Buprestis family, 429.
Buttercups, violets, who tleberries, etc., in
Java, 128,

Butterflies, collected in Singapore, 36, a new
species, 40; handsome specimens of, 48; the
Ornithoptera brookeana. 48 (ce Moths);
Calliper butterfly, 124, in Sumatra, 137-

629

143; a strange family of, 140-143; species
of, in Borneo, Sumatra, and Java, 157; in
Timor, 198; in Celebes, 2/3; a fine butter-
fly, 225, 243; comparison of the productions
of Celebes with those of other districts, 285-
291; in Amboyna, 300; of Batchian, 336;
different species of, 337; bird-winged, 341,
342; scarcity of, 349; capture of, 362; dif-
ficulties of capturing, 427; of the Ké Isl-
lands, 428; capture of, at the Aru Islands,
434; locations where the author's most beat-
tiful specimens were obtained, 539.
Butterfly of the genus Pieris, 362.

C.

Cajeli, harbor of, 387; the town of, 387; the
Kajah of, 388; excursion from, 389; return
to, 394.

Calliper butterfly, 124.
Cajeli vocabulary, 606.
Camarian vocabulary, 606.
Carabidæ, 343.

Carnivorous animals of the Moluccas, 397.
Carpophaga perspicillata 348; C. concinna,
Cassowary of the Moluccas, 403.
376, 423; C. neglecta, 376.
Cats, wild, 26.

Celebes, island of, 16; north, 16; a forest
country, 19; resemblance to Australia, 25
(see Macassar); natural history of, 277-291;
birds in, 277-282; mammalia, 282-285; na-
tives of the, 394.

Census, taking a, in I ombock, 186; difficul
ties in the way of, 187; the Kajah's strata-
gem, 187, 188; his pilgrimage to the Gu-
nong-Agong (the great fire-mountain), 188-
190; complete success of the stratagem, 191,
192.

Centipedes, 470.

Cepa, village of, 363.

Ceram, visit to, 355 et seq.; maps of, 356, 369,
517; schools and schoolmasters of, 357;
Christianity established in. 357; inhabit-
ants of, 357, 358; trip to the interior, 360;
forests of, 361; a forest desert, 362; jour-
ney along the const, 663-365; a perfect
desert in zoology, 367; the Alfuros of Pa-
puan race the predominant type, 370; trade
and natural productions of, 381; great sago
district of, 382; voyage from, to Waigiou,
5.6 e se.; difficulties of the voyage, 518
Cerambyx found at Bouru, 392.
e' seo.; an indigenous race there, 590.
Ceyx Crjeli, 395

Chafer, lo g-armed, 309.

Charmosyna placentis, a bird of Djilolo, 322,

336.

Chinese, in Singapore, 32; their bazar, 33;
trades and occupations of, 33; Jesuits among,
34, 35,

Christians of Ceram, 358.

Cockatoos, 25; in Lombock, 165; of the Aru
Civets, 26; civet cats of the Moluccas, 397.
Cock-fighting at Dobbo, 477.
Islands, 450, 451; their habits, 451, 452.
Cokroaches, fed on by the Birds of Paradise,
557.

Cocoa-nut trees and cocoa-nuts of Batchian,
341; of Matabello, 372; luxury of, 373; of
the Ké Islands, 424.

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