The History of North America, Volumen19

Portada
Printed and published for subscribers only by George Barrie & Sons, 1905
 

Comentarios de la gente - Escribir un comentario

No encontramos ningún comentario en los lugares habituales.

Otras ediciones - Ver todas

Términos y frases comunes

Pasajes populares

Página 38 - In the first place, the linguistic map, based as it is upon the earliest evidence obtainable, itself offers conclusive proof, not only that the Indian tribes were in the main sedentary at the time history first records their position, but that they had been sedentary for a very long period. In order that this may be made plain, it should be clearly understood, as stated above, that each of the colors or patterns upon the map indicates a distinct linguistic family. It will be noticed that the colors...
Página 39 - It will be noticed that the colors representing the several families are usually in single bodies, ie, that they represent continuous areas, and that with some exceptions the same color is not scattered here and there over the map in small spots. Yet precisely this last state of things is what would be expected had the tribes representing the families been nomadic to a marked degree. If nomadic tribes occupied North America, instead of spreading out each from a common center, as the colors show that...
Página 251 - On the contrary, the older cities continued to flourish while the movement was going on. Such at all events are the deductions arising from a comparison of dates. How do these conclusions agree with the cognate evidence? . Perhaps the strongest evidence of the greater antiquity of Copan is to be found in the conditions underlying the foundations of the ruined buildings that occupy the surface. Where the river during its encroachments has torn away these foundations it has exposed to view the remains...
Página 258 - Notwithstanding the success of these Maya masons in erecting buildings capable of standing for hundreds of years, they were yet ignorant of some of the most essential principles of stone construction, and are thus to be regarded as hardly more than novices in the art. They made use of various minor expedients, as any clever nation of builders would, but depended largely on mortar and inertia to hold their buildings together.
Página 226 - Near here, on the road to the city of San Pedro, in the first town within the province of Honduras, called Copan, are certain ruins and vestiges of a great population and of superb edifices, of such skill and splendour that it appears that they could never have been built by the natives of that province.
Página 380 - ... usually mixed with pieces of charcoal, partially burned bones, &c. Fragments of pottery are also found in the same connection. The walls and mounds are composed of a light colored clay, which becomes red on being slightly burned. From all the facts observed, it is likely that clay was mixed with the straw, and made into some coarse kind of envelope or covering, for sacrifices about to be consumed. The whole was probably then placed on the wall of earth, mixed with the requisite fuel, and burned....
Página 66 - Directly, however, our ancestors spread into temperate climates, this mode of life would become impossible, and they would be compelled to seek their nourishment, in part at least, from the animal kingdom. Then, if not before, the knife and the hammer would develop into the spear and the club. It is too often supposed that the world was peopled by a series of
Página 88 - Two feet below the surface the first indications of burials were reached, quantities of broken bones being met with at every stroke of the spade, interspersed with pieces of whales' bones and decaying red-wood. At a depth of five feet, the first entire skeleton was found in position, and near it several others were subsequently uncovered ; in all of them the head fronted northward, the face was downward, and the lower limbs were extended. Over the femur of one of the skeletons was a flat plate of...
Página 167 - The summit, according to tradition, was crowned by a temple enclosing a colossal statue of the Sun, made of a single block of stone, of which, however, no remains are at present to be seen. The pyramid of the Moon, though...
Página 90 - ... piece of iron, a nail and various shell ornaments and beads. Near at hand, to the rear, were a broken mortar and pot, underneath which was a small olla, the whole covering the skull of a child ; and a little deeper, a skull resting upon a fine, large, pear-shaped steatite olla, the outside of reddish color. These remains...

Información bibliográfica