Long-term Potentiation: Enhancing Neuroscience for 30 Years

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Tim V. P. Bliss, G. L. Collingridge, Richard G. M. Morris
Oxford University Press, 2004 - 398 páginas
In the thirty years since its discovery by Terje Lomo and Tim Bliss, Long Term Potentiation (LTP) has become one of the most extensively studied topics in contemporary neuroscience. In LTP the strength of synapses between neurons is potentiated following brief but intense activation. LTP isthought to play a central role in learning and memory, though the exact nature of its role is less clear. In spite of years of research, there are many questions about LTP regarding its functional relevance that remain unanswered - for example, is it a model of memory formation, or is the actualneural mechanism used by the brain to store information?This volume presents a state of the art account of LTP. It begins with lively accounts, by the scientists most closely involved, of the discovery of LTP and of the experiments that established its basic properties and induction mechanisms. Later contributions contain reviews and new research thatcover the range of molecular, cellular, physiological and behavioural approaches to the study of LTP. Provocative, accessible, and authoritative, this book makes it clear why LTP continues in equal measure to puzzle and beguile neuroscientists today.Advance praise for Long Term Potentiation: "This book provides a definitive overview of the development of ideas about synaptic plasticity and about the wide range of current research in this fascinating field." Colin Blakemore, University of Oxford
 

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Derechos de autor

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Acerca del autor (2004)

Timothy Bliss is at Division of Neurophysiology, National Institute for Medical Research, Mill Hill, London. Graham Collingridge is at MRC Centre for Synaptic Plasticity, Department of Anatomy, University of Bristol.

Información bibliográfica