Ozark Magic and Folklore

Portada
Courier Corporation, 1964 M01 1 - 367 páginas
This basic study by a renowned folklorist includes eye-opening information on yarb doctors, charms, spells, witches, ghosts, weather magic, crops and livestock, courtship and marriage, pregnancy and childbirth, animals and plants, death and burial, household superstitions, and much more.

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LibraryThing Review

Crítica de los usuarios  - Dead_Dreamer - LibraryThing

This is a classic study on backwoods folk-magick. It was originally written in the 40s, so the author was able to interview folks who lived in the 1800s. The author lived in the Ozarks (one of the few ... Leer comentario completo

LibraryThing Review

Crítica de los usuarios  - keylawk - LibraryThing

Bewitched by the water witching, the yarns, tall tales and ghost stories of the Ozarks. Leer comentario completo

Páginas seleccionadas

Contenido

Sección 1
3
Sección 2
10
Sección 3
34
Sección 4
53
Sección 5
82
Sección 6
89
Sección 7
92
Sección 8
121
Sección 13
177
Sección 14
185
Sección 15
192
Sección 16
211
Sección 17
240
Sección 18
242
Sección 19
264
Sección 20
301

Sección 9
142
Sección 10
155
Sección 11
162
Sección 12
172
Sección 21
328
Sección 22
332
Sección 23
343

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Acerca del autor (1964)

Noted folklorist Vance Randolph was born in Pittsburg, Kansas. After attending college at Kansas State Teachers College, Clark University, and the University of Kansas, he worked as a staff writer for Appeal to Reason, as an assistant instructor in psychology at the University of Kansas, and as a scenario writer for MGM studios in California before devoting all of his time to freelance writing. Randolph is perhaps one of America's most prolific collectors of folk tales, and he is especially renowned for his study of the Ozarks and that region's ribald folk literature. Because of their bawdy nature, many collectors and compilers have passed over such tales from this region, but Randolph compiled many of them in a work entitled Pissing in the Snow and Other Ozark Folk Tales (1976). His regional specialization has led to a number of other works, including The Ozarks: An American Survival of Primitive Society (1931), From an Ozark Mountain Holler: Stories of Ozark Mountain Folk (1933), Ozark Superstitions (1947), and Sticks in the Knapsack and Other Ozark Folk Tales (1958). Regarding his work on the Ozarks, critics have said that Randolph "gives a sensitive portrayal of a fast-vanishing breed of people . . . [and] insight to a way of life that is rapidly passing" (Choice).

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