Liberty, Equality, Fraternity: And Three Brief Essays

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University of Chicago Press, 1991 - 311 páginas
With great energy and clarity, Sir James Fitzjames Stephen (1829-1894), author of History of the Criminal Law of England, and judge of the High Court from 1879-91, challenges John Stuart Mill's On Liberty and On Utilitarianism, arguing that Mill's view of humanity is sentimental and utopian.

"His writing is strong meat—full of the threat of hellfrire, the virtue of government by the lash and a fervent belief that the state cannot remain neutral but has a duty to espouse a moral code."—Roderick Munday, Cambridge Law Journal

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Crítica de los usuarios  - madepercy - LibraryThing

I discovered this book while reading something about Mill. It was a critique of Mill's On Liberty and it presents a number of arguments that are hard to fault, but also a number of arguments that, if ... Leer comentario completo

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Contenido

James Fitzjames Stephen
7
Bibliography of Works by Stephen
20
1874
26
The Doctrine of Liberty in General
52
The Liberty of Thought and Discussion
74
HI The Distinction between the Temporal
123
The Doctrine of Liberty in Its Application
135
Equality
179
Fraternity
221
Conclusion
262
Note on Utilitarianism
272
FROM ESSAYS BY A BARRISTER 1862
285
General Index
305
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Sir James Fitzjames Stephen (1829-94), author of History of the Criminal Law of England, was judge of the High Court from 1879-91.

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