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VI

Plate 18

WHITE.

Inouye Inseki.
Black. -- Yasui Shintetsu.

Played December, 1835. No handicaps were given. This game is from a Japanese work called “Kachi Sei Kioku.” The notes

are taken from Korschelt, and as in the previous instance involve the repetition of some things that have been touched on in the preceding chapters.

BLACK

White

1. R 16.

3. Q.3. 5. C 4.

2. D 17
4. P 17.

6. C 14. Just as good as D 15, which we already know.

8. Q 14.

7. Q5. This may be the best play under the circumstances. The secure position Q3-Q 5 supports the advance posts at C 4 and R 16 in equal measure.

9. P 16. 11. Q 15. 13. P 15. 15. R 14. 17. Q 13.

10. Q 16. 12. Q 17. 14. R 15. 16. S 15.

18. N 17. The eighth played at Q 14 cannot be saved. If White attempts to save it, the following would be the continua

stone at say

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If White had had an opportunity of placing a stone on the line of retreat

19. P 14. Takes. S 14 probably would have been better, because it would have retained the “Sente" for Black; that is to say, a play which the opponent is compelled to answer, or otherwise sustain too great a loss. Had Black played at S 14, White must have answered at S 16, in order not to lose the stones at R 15-S 15, and also the corner, which is worth about fourteen “Me." To White's play at S 16 Black would probably have answered at R 12 and thus obtained a secure position.

21. R 9.

23. J 3.

E
3,

then White could have saved No. 8. (This has already been explained in defining the Japanese expression “Shicho.")

20. S 16.

22. E 3.

24. D 5. This is analogous to No. 8, but it is not advanced so far because Black has already occupied J 3.

26. D 6.
28. D 7.
30. D 8.

25. C 5. 27. C 6. 29. C7

A B C D E F G H J K L M N O P Q R S T 19 254-256-218 219

239-237
238

19 18 (148 144 147 21) 189

(201) 197

(200 ( 136 135 18 17 (152 1432 141 220 184 183 185 (165 191 18 226 4 12 123 124 17 16242-146-130 129 151 188 187 250 251 115 225

(118 9 110 120 (116 16 15(40 149 149 150 (171) 274 (23 (22 (106 13/11 141(16.10515 14 241 153 6 160 159 170 (166 (101) 97 102) 198 15 (103117

14 13 - 155 154 186 187 167 168 99 98 100 III 114 17 126 100 139 13 12 157 156 181 176 174 175 (120 121 245 246 (112) 1108 109 96 90 213-212.12 11 161 158 179 173 177 169 (172) 85 95 94 107110 88 89-92)

21111 10203 202 (162 (180 178 208 209 22782) 229 84 113 127 87 86 91 21710 9 163 31 164 210 128 130 138 81 BA 232 233 (21) 9 8 215 214 30 68 77 139 8083

8 7 29(28 54 (52) 55 64 73 (76

79

7 6 27 26 49 190 5370 67 69 231 (72) 63

6 5 25 24 (50 46 47 199675 71 38 235

6261 7

5 4 5 36 41 44 45 (44 74 196 236 60 S7

4 3 37 3322) 3943 2365 32 (58 (563

3 2 207 35 34 42 40 198 243 51 48 66

19259

2 1 205-204-206 1248–2474249 252

194 193,195

1 A B C D E F G H I K L M N O P Q R S T 78 PLAYED AT J793 AT R10 119 AT P12(KO)122) AT P13(KO) 125 AT P 12(KO) 128 AT P 13(KO) (13) AT P12(KO)133 AT Q 14 134 AT P13(KO) 137 AT P 12(KO) 140 AT P 13(KO)142) AT P12 (216 AT S 11(KO)253AT S 12(KO)255 AT S 11

PLATE 18

[blocks in formation]

31. C 9.

1

32. L 3

White has established the long line on D and allowed Black a large territory in order to be able to occupy L 3. If he had played there immediately in answer to Black's twenty-third move, then either L 3 or E 3 would have been in great danger.

34. D 2. 36. D 4. 38. L 5. 40. F 2. 42. E 2.

33. D 3. 35. C 2. 37. C 3. 39. F 3.

41. E 4. Black compels White to take 41, in order to make good his

44. F 4. 46. F 5. 48. K 2.

50. E 5. Takes.

52. H 7 54. G 7. 56. P 3. 58. O 3. 60. O 4. 62. N 5.

64. K 7. An interesting attack that determines the course of the game for a long time. 65 J 8, would mean abandoning the position on G-J (26 "Me"), but it would give an opportunity for a bold attack. If Black played 65, J 6, his stones

escape.
43. G 3.
45. G 4.
47. G 5.
49. F 6. “Sente.”
51. J 2.
53. H 6.
55. J 7
57. P 4.
59. Q 2.
61. 05.
63. 06.

i

1

would scarcely survive.

66. L 2.

65. K 3. “Sente.” White must

White

Black reply to it, or he would find himself without the necessary “Me” in

that group:

73. L 7

67. K 6.

68. J 8. 69. L 6.

70. J 6. Takes. 71. K 5. Avoids “Ko" and 72. N 6. nevertheless assures a connection.

74. K 4. Is played for the same

reason as No. 66. 75. J 5.

76. N 7 77. K 8.

78. J 7. 79. O 7.

80. N 8. 81. L 9.

82. J 10. 83. 08.

84. Nio. 85. K11.

86. R 10. Now the effect of the mistake at move 19 begins to be

apparent. 87. Q 10.

88. Qu. 89. Ru.

90. R 12. 91. S 10. Takes.

92. S1. 93. R 10. Q 12 would probably

94. Mu. This move separates have been better; at all events it P 14 from Kit, and is at the same would have been surer, because it time “Sente” as regards the black assures the connection by way of

near K, because if Black Pil after White has taken. If does not answer, these stones would White does not take, but plays at be cut off by W-K 10. Moves Nos. Pu, his stones on the edge of the 98, 100, and 102 isolate the black board will die.

stones in the neighborhood of P 14. 95. LII.

96. Q 12. 97. L 14.

98. L13 99. K13

100. M 13. 101. K 14.

102. M 14. 103. S 14.

104. S 13 105. T 15.

106. N 15. 107. Om. It is certain that 108. O 12.

stones

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