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THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF TEACHERS OF SPANISH

EDITOR
AURELIO M. ESPINOSA
Leland Stanford Junior University

CONSULTING EDITORS
John D. Fitz-GERALD

J. D. M. FORD
l'niversity of Illinois

Harvard University
ASSOCIATE EDITORS
PERCY B. BURNET

ELIJAH C. Hills
Manual Training High School, Kansas City, Mo. Indiana l'niversity, Bloomington, Ind.
ALFRED COESTER

FREDERICK B. LUQUIENS Commercial High School, Brooklyn, N. Y. Sheffield Scientific School, Yale University CAROLINA MARCIAL DORADO

George T. NORTHUP Bryn Mawr College, Bryn Mawr, Penn. University of Chicago, Chicago, III. JOEL HATHEWAY

G. W. H. SHIELD
High School of Commerce, Boston, Mass. Manual Arts High School, Los Angeles, Cal.

GEORGE W. UMPHREY
University of Washington, Seattle, Wash.

ADVERTISING MANAGER

ERWIN W. ROESSLER
High School of Commerce, New York, N. Y.

THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF TEACHERS OF SPANISH

HONORARY PRESIDENTS
JUAN C. CEBRIÁN

ARCHER M. HUNTINGTON
San Francisco, Cal.

New York, N. Y.
OFFICERS FOR 1919

PRESIDENT

LIHRENCE A WILKINS
In charge of Modern Languages in the High Schools, New York, N. Y.

VICE-PRESIDENTS

RUDOLPH SCHEVILL

VENTURA FUENTES
University of California College of the City of New York

Charles P, WAGNER
University of Michigan

SEORFI ARG-TREASURER

ALFRED COESTER
Commercial High School, Brooklyn, N. Y.

EXOTIVE COUNCIL

Above officers and
CLIFFORD G. ALLEN

JOSEPHINE W. Holt
Leland Stanford Junior University

John Marshall School, Richmond, Va.
Charles P. HARRINGTON

J. WARSHAW
Kent School, Kent, Conn.

University of Missouri, Columbia, Mo.

Department of Education, New York City: Announcement.... 101

M. L. A. A. Report on Syllabus for Spanish..

103

Notes and News.

108

Reviews :

Fundamentals of Spanish Grammar (Bushee)....Samuel M. Il’axman 111

The Neo-Classic Movement in Spain (Pellissier). C. G. Allen 115

Grandes Escritores de América (Blanco-Fombona).

..Aurelio M. Espinosa 116

Bibliography:

I. School Texts...

Joel Hatheurry 117

II. Periodical Literature.

.George T. Northup 120

III. Bibliographical Notes..

John D. Fits-Gerald

129

IV. General Bibliography.

131

The Term Latin America...

..Aurelio M. Espinosa 135

The Gaucho Poetry of Argentina George W. Umphrey 144

Guía Espiritual de España: II. Ávila

Ramón Jaén 157

El Español en la A. N. de E.

Guillermo A. Sherwell 165

The New York Chapter.

Gracia L. Fernándes 170

Votes and News..

173

Obituaries

176

Reviews :

Spanish American Readers..

.G. II. H. Shield 178

España Pintoresca (Marcial Dorado)......... .F. Morales de Setién 183

Teatro Antiguo Español: Textos y Estudios. S. G. Morley

Bibliography:

II. Periodical Literature.

.George T. Northup 189

III. Bibliographical Notes..

John D. Fits-Gerald 200

IV. General Bibliography..

202

Spanish as a Substitute for German. Lawrence A. Wilkins 205

Notes on Club Work in Elementary Year. Ruth Il’ilson 222

Devices and Aids in First Year Spanish Isabelle Jl. Day 220-

Club Work in First Year High School.... Gracia L. Fernández 235

Creating a Spanish Atmosphere. Catherine C. Kelley 240

Guía Espiritual de España: III. Segovia Ramón Jaén 243

An Important Communication.

251

Resolution by International High Commission.

254

Notes and News......

255

Reviews: Three Spanish American Novels...Chas. A. Turrell 259

Bibliography:

I. School Texts....

Michael S. Donlan 265

II. Periodical Literature.

.George T. Northup 267

III. Bibliographical Notes.

John D. Fits-Gerald 276

IV. General Bibliography

279

HISPANIA

ORGANIZATION NUMBER

NOVEMBER, 1917

ON THE THRESHOLD

On Friday evening of Thanksgiving week, 1915, at the call of the writer, there gathered in a small dining room in a hotel in New York City a group of men bent on establishing an Association of teachers of Spanish. Dr. H. E. Bard, now secretary of the PanAmerican Association, presided at the meeting. A letter of encouragement was read from Professor Ramón Menéndez Pidal of Madrid. Speeches were made by several of those present, and a committee was appointed with power to draw up a constitution. That committee met at once and agreed upon the points to be incorporated. For some reason still unexplained, the chairman of the committee failed to call a second meeting, though many of those whom the committee represented were very desirous that the organization planned should be definitely established. This was a matter of great disappointment to all.

Two years passed. Again the clans were assembled. This was at a Saturday luncheon, October 21, 1916. This time the institutions represented were chiefly the local high schools and the College of the City of New York. Thirty-one were present, ten of whom were women.

This time, lest plans should again come to naught, a constitution was prepared in advance and after considerable discussion and some changes it was adopted. Mr. L. A. Wilkins was chosen president, Dr. Alfred Coester of Commercial High School, Vice-President, Miss Herlinda G. Smithers of Bay Ridge High School, Secretary-Treasurer, and Mr. M. A. Luria, * Corresponding Secretary. The society was called the Association of Teachers of Spanish. Enthusiasm and earnestness were mani

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fest at this meeting in an unusual degree. That the Association was at least established brought us all much joy.

For the November meeting Dr. E. L. Stevenson, Acting Director of The Hispanic Society of America, after consultation with Mr. Archer M. Huntington, the president of that society, offered us

the use of the hall in the museum of that institution. Professor * Federico de Onís of Columbia University was the speaker. Interest in the meeting was very great and the attendance was large.

The next meeting, that of January, 1917, was held in the same building. Dr. Peter H. Goldsmith, Director of the Pan-American Division of the American Association for International Conciliation spoke, in Spanish, upon his trip through South America where he went to present, in the name of the Association for Conciliation, a library of North American books to the Museo Social Argentino of Buenos Aires. His address was remarkably well prepared and exceptionally interesting. At the close of the program of the day Mr. Huntington, quite unexpectedly to us, appeared, accompanied by His Excellency the Spanish Ambassador to Washington, Sr. Juan Riaño y Gayangos. Sr. Riaño consented to speak to the Association

у and in his very charming manner offered us assurances of his sympathetic co-operation. He also accepted Honorary Membership in the Association.

Meanwhile as the year had progressed many outside of New York had manifested unusual interest in what our local society was doing. The suggestion came from several quarters, especially from California and the Middle West, that this local Association be made the nucleus of a National Association. To form such an organization seemed a rather stupendous undertaking, but on the basis of the good old saying that El que no se atreve no pasa el mar,

we decided to make the venture. After considerable correspondence V with Professor Espinosa the writer sent out on April 4 a circu

lar letter to about 150 teachers in different parts of the country, suggesting a National Association and making a tentative slate of committees to work toward the founding of such a society. The replies were astonishingly prompt, enthusiastic and confirmatory of the proposed plan. Hence at the meeting of April 14 the first steps were taken to form the Association. A temporary organization as a national society was effected. The appointment of committees

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